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City names most notable historic properties

Saturday, January 31, 2009 | 5:10 p.m. CST; updated 7:36 p.m. CST, Sunday, February 8, 2009
MU seniors Amanda Hoffman and Sara Nieters pass the Dumas Apartments on Hitt Street. The two have been in the building only once. "It looks like it was really nice back in the day," Hoffman said. The Dumas Apartments, located on the corner of Hitt Street and University Avenue, made the city's list of 10 Most Notable Properties.

COLUMBIA — Ten buildings and properties have been named to the Historic Preservation Commission’s 10 Most Notable Properties list. Among those named are the Dumas Apartments and the old Flat Branch wastewater treatment plant.

Representatives of all 10 properties and members of the Historic Preservation Commission, will give a presentation as part of Historic Preservation Night. The event will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Tiger Hotel.

2009 Most Notable Properties

The Columbia Historic Preservation Commission's 2009 Most Notable Properties will be honored at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Tiger Hotel at 23 S. Eighth St.

  •   Annie Fischer House: 2911 Old 63 S.
  •   Cape Cod-style private home: 1252 Sunset Drive
  •   Dumas Apartments: 413 Hitt St.
  •   State Highway Maintenance Building: 900 Old 63 N.
  •   Missouri Press Association building: 802/804 Locust St.
  •   Old Flat Branch wastewater treatment plant, now Audubon Society of Columbia's Trailside Nature Center: 800 S. Stadium Blvd.
  •   Private home: 700 Mount Vernon Ave.
  •   Quarry Heights neighborhood and quarry
  •   St. Clair Hall at Columbia College: 1001 Rogers St.
  •   Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church: 702 Wilkes Blvd.

 


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Properties are chosen by applications and nominations by Columbia residents. The property must be at least 50 years old, be occupied by a historic person, have unusual architectural qualities, renovations and interesting attributes or stories about the structure.

Evelyn Richardson, co-owner of the Dumas Apartments, discovered one such story while researching the history of the building she and her husband, Jack, have owned since 1959.

According to a newspaper article Richardson found, police raided the basement of Dumas in 1920 during Prohibition. Two arrests were made and police confiscated a four-gallon still, a 10-gallon jar of mash, a sack of hops, four bottles of beer and a pint of distilled alcohol.

Nothing remains of the old basement, which has been redesigned to fit new apartment units.

“I would just love to get in a time machine and go back and see what it looked like,” Richardson said.

Researching the building’s history, with help from her daughter Linda Doles, is something that has given Richardson a new perspective on history.

“It’s been an interesting experience because I didn’t know a lot about it,” says Richardson. “It makes history come alive."

Much like the Dumas Building, a small two-story brick building on the MKT Trail has seen decades of Columbia history. In almost 70 years, the building has served as a wastewater pumphouse, public lavatory and nature center. 

Advanced for its time, the Flat Branch treatment plant was erected in 1939 by President Franklin Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration, Sewer Utility Manager Terry Hennkens said. 

The pumps at Flat Branch were decommissioned in 1983 when the Columbia Regional Wastewater Treatment plant opened, Hennkens said, and the building and its pipes lay dormant until 1985, when the Parks Department renovated the lower level to provide public restrooms at the MKT Trail.

Since 1985 the Parks Department has allowed the Columbia Audubon Society to use the upper level to showcase local natural history as a trailside nature center.

When the Audubon Society moved in, member Dolores Clark said, members found remnants of Bunsen burners, a ventilation chimney and other bits of the sewer utility's old laboratory. Retired Columbia teacher Jeanne Barr, 86, worked with several others to convert the building. She recalled that a group of Audubon members approached the City Council about the Flat Branch building when they heard it was unused.

"They didn't really have any plans, so they agreed to let Audubon use it as a trailside museum, and we've been there ever since," Barr said.

The Parks Department has taken care to maintain the building over the years, Park Services Manager Mike Griggs said. "We recognized the value of that building as a historical site long before it became one."

 


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Comments

Marcus Wilkins February 2, 2009 | 8:40 a.m.

This would have been a great opportunity for a slide show on the site. Nothing's easier to photograph than a building, and the reader instantly wants to view the structures after reading this sentence: "The property must be at least 50 years old, be occupied by a historic person, have unusual architectural qualities, renovations and interesting attributes or stories about the structure."

Just a tip!

(Report Comment)
Graham Johnston February 2, 2009 | 3:32 p.m.

I agree with the above comment. A missed opportunity for some great online content, photos, maps, time lines. And don't just "check the clips," show me the clips. Let's see that story from the Prohibition raid reposted, along with other past stories about the other buildings. With a 100+ journalist newsroom you guys should really be putting the rest of us online journalists to shame, not just keeping pace with us.

Graham Johnston
Manager of IT
Wednesday Journal, Inc.

(Report Comment)
Matt Y February 2, 2009 | 5:58 p.m.

Pretty much came here to say the same thing as the other two. This is like posting a news article about a website and then not including a link to the site in question.

(Report Comment)
Drew Deubner February 3, 2009 | 8:16 p.m.

Only pictures of the Dumas Building?
I guess it's not a coincidence it's the one closest to the J-school.

Lots of potential, ho-hum article.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 4, 2009 | 3:23 a.m.

If ya all is that good why not do your own articles and submit them to the Missourian?

(Report Comment)
Becky Woelfel February 4, 2009 | 9:08 a.m.

Just a small clarification. The property at 700 Mount Vernon Avenue is one of only two private HOMES recognized.

(Report Comment)
Mike Martin February 4, 2009 | 11:29 a.m.

If the Missourian will contact Mitch Skov with the city's planning department, he had a nice powerpoint presentation on all the properties at last night's standing room only event that could easily be adapted for this website.

Mike
http://columbiaheartbeat.blogspot.com

(Report Comment)
Micol Walsh February 4, 2009 | 1:30 p.m.

Becky--Congratulations on having your house chosen as a Notable Historic Property. I live in Benton-Stephens and have often wondered about the house--it's unusual for the neighborhood, much bigger than most of the houses in the area. The grand old Sally Flood house at Hinkson & Ann in Benton-Stephens made the list in 2004. Now if only someone knows the history of the unusual little ornate brick house in the 1400 block of Windsor....

Mike--Thanks for your coverage in Columbia Heartbeat. That's where I first read about this year's list. Coverage in the newspapers seems woefully skimpy. Seems to me that this is the kind of local story readers would enjoy. Maybe the Missourian or Tribune will have an article on the PowerPoint presentation at Tuesday's event. I'm sorry I missed it.

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 4, 2009 | 1:56 p.m.

"If ya all is that good why not do your own articles and submit them to the Missourian?"

Because we're not students. Plus, some of us who worked at the Missourian as students are disappointed when we see missed opportunities.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 4, 2009 | 3:05 p.m.

>>>> Ayn Rand February 4, 2009 | 1:56 p.m.
Because we're not students. Plus, some of us who worked at the Missourian as students are disappointed when we see missed opportunities. <<<

When are missed opportunities not as such if all you do is complain but do absolutely nothing to get out of the boat to jump into the ocean to actually hands on help or help save the problematic issue from sinking further?

Until you yourself are willing to get out of the boat all you are is dead weight to the solutions needed.

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 4, 2009 | 3:11 p.m.

Chuck, I'm no longer a student, and I'm not on the J school faculty. That means I can't write features for the Missourian, and I can't control the coverage. What part of this don't you understand?

Today you're making even less sense than usual. What's going on?

(Report Comment)
Cullen Breedlove February 4, 2009 | 3:44 p.m.
This comment has been removed.
Charles Dudley Jr February 4, 2009 | 4:10 p.m.

>>> Ayn Rand February 4, 2009 | 3:11 p.m.
Chuck, I'm no longer a student, and I'm not on the J school faculty. That means I can't write features for the Missourian, and I can't control the coverage. What part of this don't you understand? <<<<

Why don't you go get yourself an invitation or try to get an invitation to sit in on their editorial sessions and give honest input face to face or just to go talk to their editors and journalists students since you come here and post all of the complaints and also present yourself as being "The One" with the answers to their problems.

Why is it you think you have to be an employee or a student there to make a difference? I am almost sure they would welcome you to come in and talk with them all on a one on one basis.

What are you afraid to step up and solve problems you see or are you only content as a whimpering complainer?

As I said you come across here as "The One" who can solve all of their problems in journalism better than anybody.

Well go for it then instead of crying about how their editorial stories are presented.

No excuses now either.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 4, 2009 | 4:40 p.m.

The funny thing is I'm sure this here comment box is around for people to comment on how stories can be better, praise the good ones, or add additional facts that may have been overlooked.

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 4, 2009 | 4:57 p.m.

Chuck, as John notes, that's what the comment feature is for! Why trek down to the budget meeting when I can post suggestions and comments here?

And name-calling such as "whimpering complainer" isn't necessary. It's that kind of thing that irritates the hell out of people here and on the Tribune board. Maybe that's why Gumby and others left the Tribune board.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 4, 2009 | 5:38 p.m.

Ayn Rand Why should they read or go by what you post here you cannot even under your real name. I certainly would not take any suggestion from somebody who cannot even post with their real name so why should they? The only trace of you is to a dead person. No creditability there that's for sure.

I think they are doing a fine job for student journalists but obviously some of you here that can only complain behind a fake name or do not have the gumption enough to go down to their office and talk one on one.

FYI Gumby5 told members over in T.B. they were in the military and about to go on a tour of duty so that is where most members think he left to.

As for others that is on them as nobody ever said you must reply nor read to everybody's posts if you do not like what they have posted. I sure don't.

When is it not whimpering and complaining when you yourself constantly do it? Look in the mirror Ayn Rand.

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 5, 2009 | 7:53 a.m.

"Ayn Rand Why should they read or go by what you post here you cannot even under your real name. I certainly would not take any suggestion from somebody who cannot even post with their real name so why should they?"

And yet they do. For example, a Jan. 16 column ( www.columbiamissourian.com/stories/2009/... ) cites my comments about MU turning off more lights to save money. Another column in December cited my comment about Pinkel's raise amid the cost-cutting.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 5, 2009 | 9:51 a.m.

I do believe they looked at more than just your little comments in making decisions on what to present.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 5, 2009 | 10:08 a.m.

Then why should Ayn march right down to the Missourian offices when he/she has comments on Missourian coverage? Or are your arguments based on your dislike of this person? Hmm...

(Report Comment)
Jason Callihan April 20, 2009 | 5:06 a.m.

I'd like to think the comment section is used for positive feedback, constructive criticism, and comprehensive discussion. Unfortunately this comment section is littered with interpersonal feuding, and I can learn nothing more about the contents of the article (historical properties in COMO)other than what is in the article itself. It is saddening this occurs in what is supposed to be one of the most well educated cities in America.

(Report Comment)

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