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UPDATE: Sen. Bond backs repeal of Missouri term limits law

Saturday, February 21, 2009 | 7:47 p.m. CST

KANSAS CITY — U.S. Sen. Kit Bond, retiring next year after a long Senate career, said Saturday that Missouri should repeal its limit on how long people can serve in the state legislature.

Bond said term limits are forcing too many talented lawmakers to leave office too early and placing too much power with executive branch bureaucrats and lobbyists.

Missouri voters in 1992 overwhelmingly approved a measure limiting people to about eight years each in the Missouri House and Senate. The state also adopted a term-limit amendment for members of Congress, but the courts later threw it out.

Bond was asked whether he supported term-limits for Congress during a forum Saturday at the Republicans' annual Lincoln Days conference in Kansas City. He responded by suggesting that elections serve as a natural way for people to limit the service of public officials and by decrying the effect term limits has had in the state legislature.

"Term limits for the governor and president are good ideas," Bond said. But "I have seen term limits decimate — decimate — the leadership of our Missouri General Assembly."

Missouri's term-limit clock started ticking in 1994, the first election after voters adopted the restriction. The limits had their biggest effect in 2002, when 73 of the 163 House members and 12 of 34 senators were ineligible to run for re-election. That year, 90 new House members were elected and Republicans took over the chamber from Democrats.

Dozens of members of that legislative class of 2002 will be term-limited themselves in the 2010 elections, causing another sizable upheaval in the House.

Last year, both Senate President Pro Tem Michael Gibbons, R-Kirkwood, and House Speaker Rod Jetton, R-Marble Hill, were prohibited from seeking re-election because of term limits. They were replaced in January by Senate President Pro Tem Charlie Shields, R-St. Joseph, and House Speaker Ron Richard, R-Joplin.

Several state lawmakers have proposed changing Missouri's term limits, but those measures have not gained much traction. This year, Rep. Gayle Kingery, R-Poplar Bluff, has proposed a constitutional amendment that would replace the limit of 8 years of service in each chamber with a single limit of 16 years total in either chamber. That measure is pending in the House Elections Committee.

Bond suggested a more drastic change.

"I wish the state of Missouri would get rid of the term limits on legislators," Bond said. "Repeal that term-limit law and let good legislators continue to serve."

The man who asked Bond the question about term limits said he was primarily concerned about federal lawmakers, not state lawmakers. Charles Dittmer, 66, of Greenwood, said he believes the lack of federal term limits has led to a proliferation of spending on pet projects.

"Pork, pork, pork, pork, pork!" Dittmer said in an interview. "They're not using the discipline they grew up with. It has contaminated and corrupted the system."

Dittmer did not indicate that his comments were personally directed at Bond.

But Bond, who first was elected to the Senate in 1986, has been a staunch advocate of using earmarks as a way to ensure federal funding for Missouri projects. He announced in January that he would not seek re-election in 2010.


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Comments

Charles Dudley Jr February 22, 2009 | 3:25 a.m.

Four years would be enough time for anybody.

Why let these people serve forever and ever.

(Report Comment)
Matt Y February 22, 2009 | 10:32 a.m.

What in the hell is a "talented" lawmaker?

(Report Comment)
Ray Shapiro February 22, 2009 | 2:13 p.m.

MattY:
Talented (synonyms)
able, accomplished, adept, artistic, brilliant, capable, clever, cut out for, endowed, expert, having a knack, ingenious, intelligent, masterly, proficient, shining at, skilled, smart
Lawmaker (synonyms)
congressman, congressperson, congresswoman, councilman, councilperson, councilwoman, legislator
{Hope this helps answer your question}
Charles: I agree. Even the President is given 4 years before he's up for re-election. I'd even consider a 3 year term followed with a re-election opportunity. Maximum 6 years in each chamber. 12 years as a "talented lawmaker," can then be replaced with taking on practice as a private "talented lawyer", or "talented business person."
However, career politicians brandish way too much power. We need to give those who are involved with "grass roots" advocacy the opportunity to serve in the legislative arena and keep this body of government fresh and vibrant. Those "retiring" from the legislative branch will "groom" their replacements anyway.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 22, 2009 | 4:38 p.m.

>>> Those "retiring" from the legislative branch will "groom" their replacements anyway. <<<

Ray Beck >>> Bill Watkins as an example maybe there ray shapiro?

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 22, 2009 | 11:46 p.m.

Ray Beck and Bill Watkins did/do not hold legislative offices.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 4:25 a.m.

John Schultz one held a city government office and one does hold a city government office so both are by default in some form or were in some form of a legislative form of office being it only is a city government the same principle applies in this scenario.

That is what I was talking about to ray shapiro and the potential or possibilities of behind the scenes grooming for those offices by one of the other.

It would not be the first time this went on somewhere in our nation.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 23, 2009 | 8:17 a.m.

Bill Watkins and Ray Beck did not vote on ordinances, therefore they are not legislators. They wield some power behind the scenes, but the power to implement laws lies with the city council.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 11:55 a.m.

John Schultz were did I say they voted? I didn't. One can be a form of a legislators with out voting John.

You might want to look here for the over all definition:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/l...

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 23, 2009 | 12:22 p.m.

That link sure doesn't seem to apply to Ray Beck or Bill Watkins, now does it?

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 1:41 p.m.

noun
1. a person who gives or "makes laws".

Makes A.K.A. "proposes laws" as in "writes law proposals" for inclusion into current ordinances by a select group IE" City Council.

Argue it all you want John it does apply.

A legislator does not necessarily have to be the one voting on the issue.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 23, 2009 | 2:16 p.m.

Uh-huh. So is a lobbyist a legislator if they provide language to a "real" legislator for inclusion into a bill? Is the coalition against Tasers full of legislators as well since they want to shape public policy and see the council enact restrictions? How about those folks circulating petitions for various items to go on the ballot? Those will be law if enacted by the voters, right?

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 3:57 p.m.

http://www.wordreference.com/definition/...

legislator
A noun
1 legislator
someone who makes or enacts laws
Category Tree:
entity
╚object; physical object
╚living thing; animate thing
╚organism; being
╚person; individual; someone; somebody; mortal; human; soul
╚leader
╚lawgiver; lawmaker
╚legislator
╚Parliamentarian; Member of Parliament
╚minority leader
╚majority leader
╚frontbencher
╚floor leader
╚filibuster; filibusterer
╚deputy
╚crossbencher
╚congressman; congresswoman; representative
╚backbencher

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionar...

legislator
One entry found.

Main Entry:
leg·is·la·tor Listen to the pronunciation of legislator Listen to the pronunciation of legislator
Pronunciation:
\ˈle-jəs-ˌlā-ˌtȯr, -ˌlā-tər also ˌle-jəs-ˈlā-ˌtȯr\
Function:
noun
Etymology:
Latin legis lator, literally, "proposer of a law", from legis (genitive of lex law) + lator proposer, from ferre (past participle latus) to carry, "propose" — more at tolerate, bear
Date:1603

: one that makes laws especially for a political unit ; especially : a member of a legislative body
— leg·is·la·to·ri·al Listen to the pronunciation of legislatorial \ˌle-jəs-lə-ˈtȯr-ē-əl\ adjective
— leg·is·la·tor·ship Listen to the pronunciation of legislatorship \ˈle-jəs-ˌlā-tər-ˌship\ noun

If you need more references I am sure I can pull up a alot more that all say the same definition of the word.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 23, 2009 | 4:12 p.m.

And your definitions will still not apply to Watkins and Beck, but I give up, you win this pointless argument. Happy now?

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 4:59 p.m.

That is where you are wrong John Schultz,but you will not ever see that due to your legalistic attitude look upon things.

(Report Comment)
Ricky Gurley February 23, 2009 | 6:38 p.m.

John Schultz has forgotten more about politics than you'll ever know, Chuck.

Anyone here that knows anything about you and him, will listen to what John Schultz has to say about politics over your uneducated, non-sense, any day of the week.

Rick.

(Report Comment)
Mark Foecking February 23, 2009 | 6:42 p.m.

Chuck:

"Section 2. Form of Government.

The municipal government provided by this charter shall be known as the "council-manager government." Pursuant to the provisions of this charter and subject only to the limitations imposed by the state constitution and by this charter, all powers of the city shall be vested in an elective council, hereafter referred to as "the council," which shall enact local legislation, adopt budgets, determine policies, and appoint the city manager, who shall execute the laws and administer the government of the city."

From the city charter:

http://www.gocolumbiamo.com/Council/Colu...

Watkins is an administrator, and an executive. The council people are the legislators.

DK

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 23, 2009 | 7:54 p.m.

Mark Foecking read the definitions I posted above. Anybody who proposes a law/ordinance can be considered as a legislator.

Unless every dictionary ever made,defined,published is wrong and in that case all of our present students around the world both past and present are screwed.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 24, 2009 | 7:14 a.m.

Appreciate the backup Mark and Rick, but once Chuck has spoken you know he can't dare change his stance!

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 24, 2009 | 8:07 a.m.

He would argue that a wall is black when he just painted it white himself -- or that it's more energy-efficient to leave lights on all the time than to turn them off periodically.

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 24, 2009 | 8:31 a.m.

Ya John the world should only see things one way and that is according to John Schultz the Chairman of the Libertarian Party of Boone Country.

John is that why I find most Libertarians I come across online and in the real world "Frazzled Insecure Neurotic Egomaniacs"?

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 24, 2009 | 9:51 a.m.

The funny thing Chuck, is that Rick and Mark agreed with what I was trying to get through your thick skull and no one is backing you up. I don't need their comments to know I'm right about what I said, but please do continue trying to diagnose Libertarians over the Internet as I am getting quite the kick out of your amateur prognostications. Lucky for you that I and most people don't lump other Paquin residents in the same slot as we have you, eh?

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 24, 2009 | 10:37 a.m.

Rick and Mark are entitled to their opinions to but you are trying to refute dictionary definitions that are proving you wrong by their bigger consensus point of view.

All of those dictionary definitions completely out weight your tiny narrow minded point of view John whether you want to admit that or not.

We all know all of those dictionary definitions that are all presenting the same things cannot possibly be wrong can they?

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 24, 2009 | 11:28 a.m.

Chuck, my wife is an English major, knows the words better than you I dare say, and told me to stop wasting my time arguing you with you. For once, I'll listen to her. Enjoy being King of the Dictionary and not much else!

(Report Comment)
Charles Dudley Jr February 24, 2009 | 12:57 p.m.

John Schultz chairman of the Libertarian Party of Boone County so your little wifey is also saying just like you that all of the dictionary references are wrong too?

How much did she invest in that high dollar education?

Me thinks some older folks need to go back to school.

(Report Comment)
Mark Foecking February 24, 2009 | 1:27 p.m.

Once again:

": one that makes laws especially for a political unit ; especially : a member of a legislative body"

There is a huge difference from proposing a law and making one. To make, or pass, a law requires a specifically vested power usually reserved, in this country, for elected officials. In other countries, appointed officials can pass laws - in extreme cases, we call them dictators.

Watkins, even though he attends all the council meetings, and makes recommendations regarding laws to the council, does not vote on legislation. For him to do so would be anti-democratic. You or I can propose legislation. But only our elected officials can make it into law.

See the difference?

DK

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 24, 2009 | 1:41 p.m.

No Chuck, my wife like others is saying you are wrong and twisting words to defend your wrongness. Be happy I'm not passing along the other comments.

If you feel particularly brave, why don't you try refuting some of my claims of whom else would be legislators under your broadened definitions?

(No one tell my wife about this, OK?)

(Report Comment)
Jim Dog February 24, 2009 | 1:43 p.m.
This comment has been removed.
Charles Dudley Jr February 24, 2009 | 2:26 p.m.

Mark Foecking: Once again Mark I will keep it really simple so even a chemist at M.U. such as you are can understand it:

One who makes or proposes can be considered as a legislator.

See the meaning?

The definition of the word "make"

http://www.answers.com/make&r=67

We can do this pissing match all day if you like.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz February 24, 2009 | 2:35 p.m.

From my earlier comment that Chuck dodged:

"So is a lobbyist a legislator if they provide language to a "real" legislator for inclusion into a bill? Is the coalition against Tasers full of legislators as well since they want to shape public policy and see the council enact restrictions? How about those folks circulating petitions for various items to go on the ballot? Those will be law if enacted by the voters, right?"

Is someone asking for restored public funding for a recreation program at his place of living a legislator?

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 24, 2009 | 7:15 p.m.
This comment has been removed.
Charles Dudley Jr February 24, 2009 | 7:34 p.m.

John Schultz you are so full of yourself you really should not hold it in so long it is bad for your health.

I made my presentation,presented the facts and now I am done. Have fun arguing with yourself.

(Report Comment)
Ayn Rand February 24, 2009 | 8:21 p.m.
This comment has been removed.
Charles Dudley Jr February 25, 2009 | 3:48 a.m.

Wrong Ayn Rand I choose not to let people keep nitpicking and allowing these pissing matches go forward.

(Report Comment)

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