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St. Joseph sues state over property tax bill veto

Thursday, August 6, 2009 | 11:16 a.m. CDT; updated 11:48 a.m. CDT, Thursday, August 6, 2009

*CORRECTION: St. Joseph is suing the state, not Gov. Jay Nixon. The property tax law was passed in 2008, not 2007. An earlier version of this story misidentified the defendant and gave the incorrect year for the law.

ST. JOSEPH — The city of St. Joseph is suing the state* over property tax legislation.

The city says a 2008* law limiting property tax rates prevents the city from collecting its voter-approved property tax. St. Joseph estimates it could cost the city more than $300,000 in lost revenue.

Lawmakers earlier this year approved a bill that St. Joseph said would have resolved the issue. But Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed it because he said it would have allowed several tax districts to raise property taxes without voter approval.

St. Joseph City Manager Vince Capell said the city hoped to either have the veto rescinded or have a court declare the 2008 law unconstitutional.

The lawsuit was filed in the Capitol's home of Cole County.


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