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Historic Preservation Commission names 7 'most notable' properties

Tuesday, February 2, 2010 | 11:42 p.m. CST; updated 8:49 a.m. CST, Wednesday, February 3, 2010

COLUMBIA — Seven properties have been named "most notable" Tuesday by the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission. Members of the commission, the properties' owners and representatives and the public shared stories and histories of each property.

"We try to have a balance of both residential, commercial properties, academic buildings and ecclesiastic buildings, like churches," commission chairman Brian Treece said.

The seven notable properties are: Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house, a house on Bingham Road, the stables at Stephens College, the brick streets throughout Columbia, MU's Schlundt Hall, the Berry Building and Jewell Cemetery.


View Columbia Notable Properties in a larger map

Nominated properties must be within the city, be at least 50 years old and have architectural or historical characteristics that add to Columbia's social or aesthetic resources.

The properties honored are listed below, along with facts about the properties presented by the commission.

Brick streets, throughout Columbia | The bricks on and around Lee Street in East Campus have paved the road since 1909, making the area one of the oldest brick pavings in Columbia. There are 10 streets in Columbia that are fully or partially paved in brick. The streets slow traffic and have an old-world feel, the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission said.
Schlundt Hall, MU, south of University Avenue and west of College Avenue | Built in 1922, Schlundt Hall was named after Herman Schlundt, an MU professor and chemistry department chairman. Located in MU's white campus, the building is the sixth most notable property named at MU.
Stephens stables, Stephens College campus, 203 Old 63 | The Saddleseat/Western Barn, pictured in this panorama photo composite, was constructed in 1939. The barn is the home to the Prince of Wales Club, which is the oldest continually active riding club across the country.
The Berry Building, Walnut and Orr streets | Built as a storage warehouse in 1924, the Berry Building was best known as the Nowell Wholesale Grocery Company owned by the Nowell Family. It is now home to loft apartments and commercial spaces.
The Baugher home, 211 Bingham Road | The home was one of the first four houses built in the Grasslands neighborhood. The house was a Georgian-style home designed by the local architect and MU professor Harry Satterlee Bill. It was constructed in 1927.
The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house, 809 S. Providence Road | The house was constructed in 1880 by George Bingham Rollins. Claude Bruner bought the house from the Rollins family in 1939. The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity purchased the house from Bruner family in 1954. The house is part of the historic Grasslands neighborhood.
Jewell Cemetery State Historic Site, South Providence Road | Owned by George Jewell, the Jewell Cemetery buried Charles Hardin, the 22nd governor of Missouri, and descendants of William Jewell, who served as Columbia's mayor in the 1820s. The site is maintained by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

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