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TODAY'S QUESTION: Do you feel the flashing yellow left-hand turn arrows at multiple intersections of Stadium make the road safer or more dangerous for drivers?

Thursday, March 11, 2010 | 1:31 p.m. CST

On Tuesday, The Missouri Department of Transportation made significant changes to seven intersections on Stadium Boulevard from Maryland Avenue. to U.S. 63 Interchange. At these locations, the green light, which signaled drivers in the left hand turn lane to yield when entering the intersection, was replaced with a flashing yellow arrow.

The flashing yellow arrow indicates to drivers that they may cautiously make a left turn after assessing oncoming traffic and pedestrians. This change was intended to improve safety at the intersections. These arrows have already been in use in cities across the nation including St. Louis and Kansas City.

Do you feel the flashing yellow left-hand turn arrows make the road safer
or more dangerous? Are drivers prepared to respond to this change in the rules of the road?


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Comments

Janet Cox November 28, 2011 | 11:37 p.m.

We moved to St. Peters, Missouri for my husband's work. We've lived in Illinois, Virginia, but grew up in Wisconsin. We've traveled across the country. Besides the fact I saw on the local news that Missouri is second in leading the nation as far as bad drivers go (which I have to believe because someone rear ended me at a stop light, AFTER they had stopped (without hitting me), but when they started to move, tried to go around me and hit my rear bumper- and took off!

The blinking yellow arrow- I don't think residents know how it's properly used. Across the nation, people making left hand turns with a green light, or yellow flashing light/arrow, will pull into the intersection, so at the very least, one or two cars can complete a left hand turn. In St. Peters, they don't enter the intersection to wait for an opportunity to turn, unless there are no on-coming cars. There have been instances where NO left hand turns have been completed while I have sat in the left turn lane behind Missouri residents.

One neighbor of ours who moved here a couple years ago, stated her husband was pulled over for entering an intersection with a yellow light, while waiting for a gap in the oncoming traffic to turn. It's just weird after living so many places and having people use left hand turn lanes all the same, then moving here and seeing so many people not how to turn like everone else.

(Report Comment)
Jimmy Bearfield November 29, 2011 | 8:09 a.m.

"Across the nation, people making left hand turns with a green light, or yellow flashing light/arrow, will pull into the intersection, so at the very least, one or two cars can complete a left hand turn."

That's why many cities (e.g., NYC) have cops standing on the corners so when the light changes, they can simply walk up to the cars stranded in the intersection, take the driver's license and generate a ticket on the spot for blocking an intersection. That enforcement dissuades some drivers from pulling into the intersection and hoping that there will be an opening before the light turns red.

Other drivers might be hesitant to pull into the intersection because they routinely see drivers run red lights, which is why so many cities have red-light cameras. So they don't want to risk turning as the light is changing from solid yellow for fear of getting T-boned.

(Report Comment)

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