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Deer in Linn County show no new signs of chronic wasting disease

Friday, March 19, 2010 | 12:17 p.m. CDT

JEFFERSON CITY — Environmental officials say tests of 50 captive white-tailed deer in Linn County turned up no signs of chronic wasting disease.

State Veterinarian Taylor Woods says it doesn't appear that there is widespread infection in the northern Missouri county's deer herd. A captive white-tailed deer there tested positive for the disease last month.

Chronic wasting disease is a neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose. It has been documented in 15 states and two Canadian provinces.

The disease is transmitted live from animal-to-animal or soil-to-animal contact and has never been reported in humans or cattle.

The state Department of Conservation continues to test free-ranging deer within 5 miles of where the initial positive case was found.


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Comments

Gina Butler March 19, 2010 | 2:29 p.m.

I'd actually like to point out that CWD hasn't been reported in humans and cattle because that isn't what it's called in humans or cattle. In cattle, CWD is called "mad-cow" disease and in humans, it's Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease or transmissable spongiform encephalopathy (TSE).

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