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Missouri jobless rate falls as employment climbs

Monday, July 12, 2010 | 7:51 p.m. CDT; updated 8:21 p.m. CDT, Monday, July 12, 2010

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri added 3,600 jobs last month while the unemployment rate declined to its lowest point since April 2009.

The Department of Economic Development reported Monday that the June unemployment rate fell two-tenths of a percentage point from May to 9.1 percent.

Some of the largest job gains were in manufacturing, which added 2,300 jobs last month. Other big gains were in warehousing and utilities, which added 2,200 jobs, and the construction sector, which climbed by 1,100 jobs.

Those gains were partially offset by the elimination 3,300 federal government jobs. That included many temporary census workers.

Boone County stands to gain more than 1,000 jobs in the near future as three major businesses develop in the area. Carfax is expanding its Columbia data facility and expects to add 45 to 50 new jobs in the next three to five years.

IBM, which is opening a new call center in Columbia this fall, has said it will create as many as 800 jobs in the area.

A new sugar-substitute plant in Moberly could create 312 jobs in the next 28 months, according to the Moberly Monitor-Index. Gov. Jay Nixon said the plant might eventually employ 612 workers.

Missourian reporter Daniel Everson contributed to this report.


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Comments

Tracy nowlin July 13, 2010 | 6:23 a.m.

Go figure. Do they not count the amount of Missourians that have lost their Unemployment, due to there being no extentions. There are more then 2000 people a week who are no longer receiving Unemployment. What about those people? They should be counted too. Those people have to survive too. So what are they going to do to feed their families. Most likely go sign up for public assistance. And yes those citizans have been looking for work. Mine has been laid of since December.

(Report Comment)
Andrew Hansen July 13, 2010 | 12:37 p.m.

Tracy, the unemployment rate is not calculated simply based upon the number of people collection unemployment benefits.
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The unemployment rate is an estimate based upon the data collected by the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey. The BLS uses data from this mega-survey to estimate various unemployment measures. The measure usually cited is an estimate of the number of people who are out of work, want a job, are currently able to work, and have done something to look for a job in the past four weeks. If they meet these conditions they will be counted as unemployed weather or not they are currently collecting benefits.
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Now, there is a caveat, of course. The number of people collecting benefits is used an addition factor for local estimates, but it is still not the definition of unemployed when calculating the unemployment rate. If you compare the number of people colletion benefits (reported by the Dept of Labor) to the the number of people estimated as unemployed (as calculated by the BLS), you will see that the unemployed estimate is always significantly higher than the number of people collecting benefits.

(Report Comment)

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