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Fall into Art: Meet Jack Stanley

Friday, September 17, 2010 | 12:19 p.m. CDT; updated 10:39 p.m. CDT, Friday, May 11, 2012

COLUMBIA — From age 15, Jack Stanley loved to take pictures for his high school and college yearbooks and art photography.

Seeing him now, cleaning the lens of his Nikon, comfortable on a couch in the PURE Photography Gallery and Studio on East Broadway, one would think pictures were always a part of his life, even all of it.

If you go

What: Fall into Art

When: From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday

Where: Parkade Center, 601 Business Loop 70 W.

For information: Fall into Art



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But up until 2001, Stanley did not display his art publicly. In fact, he hardly took any pictures.

Yet now, at 57, he is putting time and energy into taking pictures and spending time at the new studio. His work will show this weekend at the Fall into Art festival at the Parkade Center.

Stanley's face lights up when he talks about photographs, and his passion comes through his words and frequent laughter.

“In 1999, I started playing with the digital photography, and it just rekindled my interest, and I got really involved in taking pictures,” he said.

Stanley has an interesting art style. He takes pictures of all sorts of things and is not afraid to experiment with his photographs.

Stanley said: “I like to try different things. A couple of things are not straight pictures, although they started as photographs. So I am not afraid to blend digital along with traditional photography.”

When Stanley is alone and completely focused, he feels he has the most potential to produce great work.

“I spent four days in Phoenix in 2008 and I spent those four days in a two block by four block radius," Stanley said. "I didn’t travel around the community.”

Dale and Lisa Lloyd, owners of the PURE Studio, approached Stanley in February and expressed interest in wanting to open a gallery solely for photography.

Before photography became permanent in his life, Stanley had a variety of things on his plate. He worked at a small newspaper in southeast Missouri and owned various Sylvan Learning Centers.

When he’s not busy with photography, he likes to bike ride and market artificial intelligence. Stanley came upon this opportunity when a friend of his approached him and said that Carnegie Mellon University was interested in having people promote the product.

It’s a computer that speaks to you like a person. That knows 56 languages. That’s fully conversational. That can text. It can be a face; it can just talk on the phone; it can be an avatar on the Internet. His goal is to have retailers use them, whether in avatar form or answering phones.

Stanley’s enthusiasm is for places unknown to probably most people, his interest in technology, his inner businessman and his pictures with a range including a Colorado landscape and Christmas lights. His interests continue to stretch and expand.

“In 57 years, this is the first time I cannot say precisely where I’m heading next,” Stanley said. 

Stanley estimated he has done between 40 and 50 art shows since 2001. His photographs will be on display at the Fall into Art festival this weekend at Parkade Center.


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