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Concussion not cause of Kansas high school football player's death

Friday, December 3, 2010 | 3:00 p.m. CST

KANSAS CITY — A Kansas school district where a 17-year-old football player died from an undetected head injury said it followed new state rules designed to reduce concussion risks.

Spring Hill High School senior Nathan Stiles died Oct. 29, one day after collapsing at the homecoming game. He was first injured four weeks earlier.

A coroner said Thursday Stiles died from a subdural hematoma, or bleeding between the tissue layers connecting the brain and skull. He says the injury likely occurred during the Oct. 1 game.

District officials said Friday they followed state high school athletic association rules requiring players who suffer a concussion to get medical clearance before playing.

Stiles' mother says he had a CT scan after the Oct. 1 game. The test showed no signs of bleeding in his brain.


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Melissa Tiffany December 3, 2010 | 3:55 p.m.
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