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TODAY'S QUESTION: Should the health care law be repealed?

Monday, January 24, 2011 | 10:11 a.m. CST

Republicans in the House voted on Wednesday to repeal the Affordable Care Act that was passed last year. The vote was 245 to 189.

The repeal requires the Senate’s approval and then the president’s signature to pass.

The health care law, which was passed in March, mandates health insurance and expands coverage to the previously uninsured. It has reformed and added extended insurance coverage to groups such as young adults who can now stay on their parents’ health insurance until age 26. The act also will make health insurance available to people who have been denied insurance by private companies because of pre-existing conditions.

The estimated cost of the act is $940 billion, to be spent over 10 years. It will be paid for by several taxes, including a tax on high-cost insurance policies.

A poll conducted in January by The Associated Press and GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications found that 40 percent of the 1,001 people surveyed support the law and 41 percent oppose it. Twenty-six percent said they would repeal the law completely and 43 percent want Congress to change the law to do more to reform the health care system.

Do you think the law should be repealed? If not, what would you want to see added or removed from the law?

 


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Comments

Christopher Foote January 24, 2011 | 6:45 p.m.

Only if they replace it with something better than the Affordable Care Act. Note the status quo before ACA has 30 million more uninsured and costs substantially more money (according to the CBO). A repeal vote is the same as a vote for the previous status quo.

(Report Comment)
Juan Mendez January 24, 2011 | 7:13 p.m.

Has anybody been able to prove it is Constitutional?

Juan Mendez.

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 24, 2011 | 8:20 p.m.

Republicans have continually broadcast, that the intention is to repeal and Replace Obamacare. Among other R' plans ignored, former Speaker Pelosi has kept off the floor the bill named below:

http://www.wnd.com/index.php?pageId=1084...

The Empowering Patients First Act, or H.R. 3400, introduced by R' Rep Tom Price and 27 co-sponsors. The status quo has never been an option and would wager that when time comes, new, better than Obama plans will be coming out of the woodwork.

(Report Comment)
John Schultz January 25, 2011 | 1:56 a.m.

Christopher, don't forget that the CBO didn't score the "doc fix" bill in conjunction with the main reform bill. CBO has to assume that the reimbursement rates for Medicare will drop since Congress says that's what they will do, even though the cuts have been restored several times over the years. When the costs of those reimbursements are added to the reform bill, it is no longer a money-saver.

(Report Comment)
Jack Hamm January 25, 2011 | 6:50 a.m.

Repeal it and replace it with a single payer system. If we are going to do it we might as well do it right.

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 25, 2011 | 8:25 a.m.

Jack H. - "Repeal it and replace it with a single payer system." You bent on destroying our health care system? Why would you want to do that?

(Report Comment)
Christopher Foote January 25, 2011 | 10:26 a.m.

@Mr. Schultz,

Why doe the doc fix need to included into the cost of the ACA? The reform did not address the doc fix. If ACA did not pass, there would still be the doc fix and its associated cost. It predates the health reform legislation by a decade. It is disingenuous to suggest the CBO score is misleading because it does not include the cost of previously passed legislation that increases our national debt.

(Report Comment)
Jack Hamm January 25, 2011 | 10:43 a.m.

@ Frank
How would a universal system destroy our healthcare system? Please for once use actual facts, logic and statistics instead of hyperbole and what Beck and Rush told you to think.

The World Health Organization ranks our system as #37 in the world; with many single payer systems ranked well ahead of us.

Also, single payer systems seem to be good enough for our military veterans and our senior citizens. Do you want to repeal Medicare? Should we repeal all veterans health care and make them get private insurance?

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 25, 2011 | 2:21 p.m.

Jack H. - Wish you were listening to R & B., instead of your internet sages. You would have better questions, or would not have posted the statement.

A meaningless statistic from the U.N. controlled WHO? Their ratings are disputed far and wide. W. Bush asked them early on, to please, do their job and stop the propaganda.

Our military is a unique, necessary segment of our society, who's health care is and should be paid for by the gov't that created it.

Here are a few facts. Canada is spending 150M$ per year on products and use of equipment that they don't have and can't afford. The bailout of Greece requires them to privatize their "corrupt"universal health system. U.K. and all European bankrupt countries are drastically amending their single payer health systems in order to keep heads above water. Canada and at least 56 other countries have a health care Worker crisis. Our Medicare-Medicaid are in the same boat. Obamacare says 1/2T$ will be saved from Medicare waste. Heard of anything he has saved lately? Wonder what he is waiting for?

Are you bent on destroying our health care system?

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 25, 2011 | 9:08 p.m.

Christopher - I should wait for JS, but if I don,t answer properly, you both will have license to criticize.

"The reform did not address the doc fix." The "reform" was to address our health care costs. The Dr. fix is a 200B$ expense that must be addressed whether we have BOcare or something honestly approaching affordable health care for us. BO is depending (loosely used word, here)on 1/2T$ savings in Medicare fraud to pay for his reforms. Wouldn't that have been a good campaign pledge if he intended to provide it?

It is disingenuous for D' controlled Congress to omit Dr. fix from expense of the bill, to include an unknown amount of Medicare fraud savings in the income for the bill. There are innumerable "disingenuous" parts of the law,over 100 new commissions and bureaucracies, the unnecessary taxes to our Federal Gov't., etc, etc. In my opinion,you are disingenuous to insinuate that CBO numbers should not be questioned, when I presume you know CBO does not "estimate". They arrange, or "score" the numbers given them by Congress to show, or not, the outcome preferred by that Congress. Also, in my opinion, if you are concerned that we may lose the best health care system in the world, you should back the repeal of this atrocity imposed on our legal system by the Democratic Party and it's leadership.

(Report Comment)
Christopher Foote January 26, 2011 | 10:21 a.m.

@Mr. Christian,

The CBO scored the Republican's repeal plan of the health reform bill. They estimated that the repeal would cost $230 billion over the next decade (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/con...).
They didn't include the Doc fix in that score, however. Does it make sense to include the Doc Fix and say actually the Republican plan will cost half a trillion dollars over the next decade? (This figure includes the $200-300 billion Doc fix). According to your logic any bill that addresses health care costs should include the doc fix. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that you will object to the Doc fix in scoring the Republican plan. Perhaps you could explain the logic of that.

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 26, 2011 | 11:41 a.m.

Mr. Foote - "Does it make sense to include the Doc Fix and say actually the Republican plan will cost half a trillion dollars over the next decade?" Democrats think we are dumb, they know we're not that dumb. The effort to sell BOcare cannot leave Dr. fix out of one and include it in another. It should be included in all honest projections.

Your fixation with the (in this case) relative minor problem with accounting for "Dr. fix" is apparent. Why not also address the other problems I noted? Take a look, for greater problems, at House Budget Chair Paul Ryan and office of Speaker Boehner estimates concerning ACA.

http://pundithouse.com/2011/01/cbo-shell...

(Report Comment)
Christopher Foote January 26, 2011 | 1:10 p.m.

Frank, I was responding to JS in regards to the doc fix, perhaps your complaint should be directed at him. My two cents was that if they want to repeal the health bill they should replace it with something better. The passed bill in its current iteration is better than the previous status quo. If the Republicans introduce legislation that improves on ACA, I would support it. Of course my interpretation of "improve" may be quite distinct from that of the individuals currently in control of the House of Representatives.
Also I applaud your consistency vis a vis the Doc fix, though I disagree with the logic. Perhaps you could inform others (maybe a letter to the editor) that the repeal of the health care bill will actually cost $1/2 trillion over the next decade, about twice what the CBO estimated ($230 billion).

(Report Comment)
frank christian January 26, 2011 | 3:54 p.m.

Chris - "Frank, I was responding to JS in regards to the doc fix, perhaps your complaint should be directed at him. My two cents was that if they want to repeal the health bill they should replace it with something better." Your post of 1021A, about the dr. fix was directed to me. You are apparently betting the future of our health system on projections of previously Democrat controlled CBO, who's predictions have been notoriously wrong. If I inform "others" that repeal will cost 1/2T$, will you spread the word that the law as it now stands will cost 2 1/2T$ as determined by the House Budget Committee, Republicans? If you read the link about Ryan and Boehners in which the lies and/or mistakes by Democrats in the law are spelled out, you must be either rejecting, or ignoring them and are "tilting with windmills" to prove your party of choice is the correct one.

"If the Republicans introduce legislation that improves on ACA, I would support it." I, somehow, doubt that. You have been shown innumerable problems with this law on this page and have never addressed one. I identified the Empowering Patients First Act, or H.R. 3400, introduced by R' Rep Tom Price and 27 co-sponsors. It was never allowed on the floor of the House by Speaker Pelosi. It appears to have everything ACA has, except the 130+ new commissions and their staffs and the fines (taxes?). Personally, I intend to give those trying to save our health system and our country from the clutches of the U.N. a little more time.

(Report Comment)

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