advertisement

Missouri court says former KC superintendent isn't liable

Sunday, February 13, 2011 | 3:23 p.m. CST; updated 8:26 p.m. CST, Sunday, February 13, 2011

KANSAS CITY — The Missouri Supreme Court has ruled that former Kansas City superintendent Bernard Taylor can't be sued over a stabbing of a high school student.

The court ruling last week reaffirmed a federal statute that says teachers and administrators who are faithfully performing their duties cannot be held liable for students hurting other students.

The Kansas City Star reported Sunday that a student used a box cutter in 2005 to injure the victim. The victim's attorney said the federal statute should be declared unconstitutional because it severely hampered a victim's ability to seek damages from responsible authorities.

Taylor's lawyer argued that the statute doesn't protect administrators or teachers who knowingly create a dangerous situation. And victims can still attempt to seek damages from the person who committed the crime.


Like what you see here? Become a member.


Show Me the Errors (What's this?)

Report corrections or additions here. Leave comments below here.

You must be logged in to participate in the Show Me the Errors contest.


Comments

Leave a comment

Speak up and join the conversation! Make sure to follow the guidelines outlined below and register with our site. You must be logged in to comment. (Our full comment policy is here.)

  • Don't use obscene, profane or vulgar language.
  • Don't use language that makes personal attacks on fellow commenters or discriminates based on race, religion, gender or ethnicity.
  • Use your real first and last name when registering on the website. It will be published with every comment. (Read why we ask for that here.)
  • Don’t solicit or promote businesses.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through. If you see something objectionable, please click the "Report comment" link.

You must be logged in to comment.

Forget your password?

Don't have an account? Register here.

advertisements