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Inside information aided in St. Louis ATM Solutions heist

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 | 4:45 p.m. CDT

ST. LOUIS — One of the men involved in the ATM Solutions robbery in St. Louis says inside information from an ex-employee was key in the $6.6 million heist.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 22-year-old Myron Kimble pleaded guilty Tuesday to conspiracy, kidnapping and firearms charges. Kimble was not present at the August robbery but showed up later at a house where the robbers were splitting the loot and got up to $55,000 of it.

Kimble said in court documents that he and John Wesley Jones, 36, conducted surveillance of the ATM Solutions building, discussed what weapons to use, and followed a company van. The two even discussed whether to rob the building or a van.

Kimble was present when Jones talked to the ex-employee on the phone. That former employee was not identified and apparently has not been charged.

Asked about the identity of the ex-employee, ATM Solutions President Paul Scott said, "The FBI has asked us not to comment on it. And we're just following their advice."

Two of the robbers — Jones and James Wright — have pleaded guilty. A fourth man associated with the robbers has also pleaded guilty.

The crime occurred Aug. 2 when four people forced their way into the business and stole money and stamps in what is being called the largest robbery ever in St. Louis. The robbers also took firearms from both employees and tied them up, then forced them to help place the money into an ATM Solutions van after deciding there was too much money to put in the car they drove in with.

The stolen van was taken to a home. Some money was hidden in the attic there, some was taken to a storage locker.

The U.S. Attorney's office said a day after the robbery, Jones put more than $1 million into his Dodge Charger. As he was leaving the driveway, he nearly struck an unmarked police car, then fled. Police gave chase, and Jones eventually crashed. That's when police found the massive amount of money inside the trunk, along with a loaded gun, and the crime began to unravel.

Until Tuesday, Kimble had not been publicly accused of a major role in the crime. He was facing a firearms charge and charges connected to the Nov. 21 kidnapping of the daughter and niece of Jones' girlfriend — an attempt to get a bigger share of the loot. The girls were not hurt.

Kimble admitted Tuesday that he and two other men kidnapped the two girls.

Kimble still awaits trial on kidnapping, robbery and armed criminal action charges in the city of St. Louis and in St. Charles County in a separate case. Authorities say Kimble, his brother and Jones kidnapped a 49-year-old woman and her 29-year-old daughter in April and took them to the Currency Exchange, where one of the women worked, to take about $30,000 from the safe.

Kimble's attorney, John Lynch, said he hoped the state charges would be resolved with no additional prison time for Kimble. He could get up to life in prison on the ATM Solutions robbery-related charges.


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