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New report highlights progress of Missouri roads, bridges

Thursday, April 28, 2011 | 1:51 p.m. CDT

KANSAS CITY — A new transportation report says Missouri has made strides fixing its roads. But the review says the state could lose ground as federal stimulus money expires and the state pays the tab for a surge of bond-financed highway projects.

The report was released Thursday by Washington, D.C.-based The Road Information Program, which describes itself as a nonprofit research group sponsored by insurance companies, equipment makers, engineering firms, labor unions and others.

The Missouri report analyzes road and bridge conditions, traffic congestion, economic development and job creation, highway safety and funding.

The report says that after steadily increasing since 2004, highway capital investment will soon plummet to pre-2000 levels. It says that could jeopardize future transportation improvements and compromise the state's ability to secure millions in federal matching funds.


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