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PHOTO GALLERY: Irene strikes East Coast

Sunday, August 28, 2011 | 6:25 p.m. CDT; updated 1:46 p.m. CDT, Monday, August 29, 2011
A house damaged by Hurricane Irene is seen in Virginia Beach, Va., on Sunday. From North Carolina to New Jersey, Hurricane Irene appeared to have fallen short of the doomsday predictions, but more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast reportedly lost power, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm.

Tropical Storm Irene caused flooding, vast power outages and other damage from North Carolina to New Jersey this weekend. At least 18 deaths have been reported to occur during the storm. But no major damage was reported as a result of Irene, which was eventually downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm.

David Pearson shovels debris from his home on Sunday in Kill Devil Hills, N.C. From North Carolina to New Jersey, Hurricane Irene's winds and storm surge fell short of the doomsday predictions. But the danger is far from over: With rivers still rising, severe flooding is feared across much of the East Coast over the next few days.
A man rides a bike down a flooded street in Columbia, N.C. on Sunday, a day after Hurricane Irene struck. The storm that spent 12-hours scouring the coast killed at least five people, brought pockets of flooding that required rescues along the sounds and left nearly a half-million customers without power.
Vehicles make their way through flooded roadways in Southern Shores, N.C., on Sunday after Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations. From North Carolina to New Jersey, Hurricane Irene appeared to have fallen short of the doomsday predictions, but more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast reportedly lost power, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm.
A surfer passes the broken end of the Bogue Inlet Fishing Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. on Sunday. The Pier was destroyed by Hurricane Irene. Irene spent 12 hours scouring the coast, killed at least five people, brought pockets of flooding that required rescues along the sounds and left nearly a half-million customers without power.
David Korostoff, left, and Jimmy Kaplow, both of New York, step through standing water on a walkway in New York's Central Park as Tropical Storm Irene passes through the city on Sunday. Although downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm, Irene's torrential rain coupled with high winds and tides worked in concert to flood parts of the city.

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