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UPDATE: Oklahoma, Texas board of regents clears path to leave the Big 12

Monday, September 19, 2011 | 4:53 p.m. CDT; updated 8:08 p.m. CDT, Monday, September 19, 2011

The University of Oklahoma's board of regents voted unanimously to give university President David Boren the power to choose a new conference for the Sooners.

The move is a key step if Oklahoma chooses to leave the Big 12 Conference.

Regents at the University of Texas also voted on Monday, giving President Bill Powers the same decision-making authority.

Before the vote, Powers told the regents that the school should be able to explore options, which he says could include staying in the Big 12.

Oklahoma State's regents are meeting Wednesday.

Texas A&M has already announced that it plans to leave the Big 12 and pursue membership in the SEC Conference.

 


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Comments

Ellis Smith September 19, 2011 | 7:21 p.m.

The final member school to leave should please close the door. :)

It's all about money, and only money.

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