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Anheuser-Busch drops Rose Parade float

Tuesday, November 29, 2011 | 7:45 a.m. CST; updated 9:16 a.m. CST, Tuesday, November 29, 2011

ST. LOUIS — It looks like the Budweiser Clydesdales won't be participating in the Rose Parade for the first time in many years.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that Anheuser-Busch has pulled out of the annual New Year's Day event in Pasadena, Calif., ending a long tradition of a Budweiser float pulled by the Clydesdales. The company said it notified parade organizers in May that it intended to invest in sponsorships and events more likely to reach beer drinkers.

Anheuser-Busch had been involved in the parade for nearly a century, and the Clydesdales have been pulling a float since 1953.

 


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Comments

Richard Saunders November 29, 2011 | 4:48 p.m.

Well, why would a South American beer company care about the Rose Bowl Parade?

First the banksters stole your beer, now they come after your traditions, as they have little value to outsiders.

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