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Investigators conclude Air Force punished Dover whistleblowers

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 | 9:25 a.m. CST; updated 11:11 a.m. CST, Tuesday, January 31, 2012

WASHINGTON — Federal investigators have concluded that the Air Force retaliated against four civilian workers at the Dover Air Force Base mortuary who blew the whistle on the mishandling of remains from the war in Afghanistan.

The Office of Special Counsel said in a report released Tuesday that it recommended to the Air Force that it discipline three officials who allegedly retaliated against the whistleblowers. The three were not identified by name. One is an active-duty military member, and the other two are civilians.

The problems uncovered at Dover include the loss of some body parts.

The whistleblowers had alleged they suffered retaliation for their disclosures, including job termination, indefinite administrative leave and five-day suspensions.

The Air Force is expected to study the investigators' findings before responding.


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