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Owner of closed Peppers Nightclub seeks rezoning; Odles request development plan

Thursday, June 21, 2012 | 3:20 p.m. CDT; updated 8:18 p.m. CDT, Thursday, June 21, 2012

**Editor's Note: The Planning and Zoning Commission meeting was canceled Thursday night because the commission lacked a quorum.

To legally conduct a meeting and take action on agenda items, the commission must have six of nine members present. Andy Lee, Ann Peters and Bill Tillotson were previously excused after informing the chair, Doug Wheeler, before Thursday that they would be absent. Ray Puri originally planned on attending the meeting, but needed to attend to a medical emergency and was unable to make the meeting.

Wheeler called the situation "unfortunate."

The public hearings on the agenda will be pushed back to the July 5 meeting.

COLUMBIA — The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold public hearings for the rezoning of the old Peppers Nightclub property and the Odle brothers' property on Locust Street at its meeting Thursday night.

  • Karon Rowe, who owns the property that was previously Peppers Nightclub, is requesting the property be annexed and rezoned from County C-G, general business, and R-S, single-family residential, to C-P, planned commercial zoning. In the agenda report, city staff recommended that certain kinds of businesses be eliminated from the possible uses of the property, such as bars, schools and nightclubs. Before anything else can be developed, the city sewer system has to be connected to the property at the expense of the owner. 

    Rowe requested the rezoning of her property to be tabled at the previous commission meeting on June 7. 

  • The commission is also reviewing a development plan sent by the Odle brothers to the city earlier in June. The Odle brothers, through the development firm 10th and Locust LLC, are seeking approval for the development plan concerning their property at 1110 through 1116 Locust St. The property was rezoned from R-3, residential, to C-P, planned commercial zoning, at the City Council meeting on March 5. The Odles' plan is to build a mixed-use development of apartments and possibly retail or restaurants on the first level. 
  • The commission will also consider rezoning property belonging to Sara Maguire LeMone Trust from C-3, general business, to C-P, planned commercial zoning. The 2.41-acre property is located at 1714 Commerce Court.

The Planning and Zoning Commission meeting will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Daniel Boone City Building, 701 E. Broadway.

Supervising editor is Dan Burley.


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Comments

Ray Shapiro June 21, 2012 | 3:36 p.m.

("Karon Rowe, who owns the property that was previously Peppers Nightclub, is requesting the property be annexed and rezoned from County C-G, general business,")
If there was ever a missed opportunity to use blight and eminent domain to oust a property owner, at least two of Karon's properties, one in the county, the other in city limits, seem to have fit the bill.
Seems a bit unfair for her to now reap additional financial rewards for her three properties, which apparently are up for sale, along the Range Line corridor.

(Report Comment)
Delcia Crockett June 22, 2012 | 5:09 a.m.

@Karon Rowe, who owns the property that was previously Peppers Nightclub, is requesting the property be annexed and rezoned from County C-G, general business, and R-S, single-family residential, to C-P, planned commercial zoning. In the agenda report, city staff recommended that certain kinds of businesses be eliminated from the possible uses of the property, such as bars, schools and nightclubs. Before anything else can be developed, the city sewer system has to be connected to the property at the expense of the owner...

Private citizen/taxpayer/voter here typing away at the keyboard in my home where it is quiet and still, at this time.

We need no more noise and crime in this town from this source or any other of a nature that disturbs our peace/safety.

Please do not give this woman a permit for this. Thank you.

Please give us the 42 additional officers requested and the sub-stations in our communities.

We can be very thankful that our Chief has made it past the critics who wanted him to leave, and we can pray to God he never steps down, in that he was/is an answer to the prayers to help our city/communties heal.

We need to move all bars out into the county and make Columbia dry, for the sake of our children growing up here, and we need to get rid of Joint Communications and be able to reach our officers when there is a need.

A lot of crime in Columbia is preventable. Let us all pull together, and it can happen!

Even if it is one less permit at a time!

:)

(Report Comment)
John Schultz June 22, 2012 | 9:51 a.m.

Yes Delcia, that's a great idea, force the bars into the county and make the sheriff's department responsible for them and the inflow of Columbia residents attracted to them. Let's make Columbia dry by boozing up the county! And what do you propose citizens do when they need to call the police after eliminating joint communications, publish officer's cell numbers?

(Report Comment)
Ray Shapiro June 22, 2012 | 2:21 p.m.

John:
Personally, I wouldn't mind bars banned from the city limits and couldn't care less if city grocery stores only sold beer and wine, if even that.
However, if that's too drastic for you, how about making "The District" a dry zone and allow drinking on campus and even allow a bar or two on MU property for the MUPD to monitor.
At least then we'd have a chance to make "The District" more family & elderly friendly and less "Party Central."
And as for our Joint Communications or 911 staffing and coverage problems, I'm wondering why we don't supplement the paid coverage we currently have with trained volunteers working the phones, dispatch and paperwork with 4 hour shifts. Stipends for their transportation and/or meal money might just bring in those who want to volunteer, especially if these caring folk get some acknowledgement for their voluntary community service, similar to voluntary fire department workers.
These ideas might not exactly fit into your Libertarian philosophy, however from a broader concern for the quality of life in the city limits, it might be an improvement.

(Report Comment)
mike mentor June 22, 2012 | 3:23 p.m.

Again, there is no, "build it and they will come" guarantee for family friendly development. I remember a Columbia downtown before there was this "District" and it was dying. The families of Columbia were not supporting the downtown business's that were built to cater to them. The retail shops that catered to this demographic did not do as well. The Youzeum is probably the biggest example of build it and they will come whishes up in smoke. The business's that were doing well served a younger demographic. Restauranst, bars, hipster clothing stores, artsy places, coffee shops, tattoo shops etc were doing well. When they do well, guess what happens. Other people want to duplicate that success. So, IMHO, the development will come from what the people support, not what they wish for. Our families were going to the mall and getting happy meals at McDonalds and going to bed at 8pm. Not many ways I know of for downtown developers to monetize that...

Incidentally, I love the north village development... Not so much the parking garage and student apartments....

(Report Comment)
mike mentor June 22, 2012 | 3:29 p.m.

p.s.
We already are a dry town...

After I finished some chain saw work last night I popped open a cold beer and turned the sprinklers on to try and combat the dryness!

(Report Comment)
John Schultz June 22, 2012 | 4:44 p.m.

Ray, Libertarians are all about voluntary actions, and most see law enforcement and courts as a legitimate government function; thus I would be OK with CPD and joint communications doing anything with volunteers to increase the efficacy of their services. However, I expect them to see volunteers as a risk and a liability that could not be overcome by warm bodies.

(Report Comment)
Delcia Crockett June 22, 2012 | 5:26 p.m.

@"And as for our Joint Communications or 911 staffing and coverage problems, I'm wondering why we don't supplement the paid coverage we currently have with trained volunteers working the phones, dispatch and paperwork with 4 hour shifts.."

What I am most concerned about is the stated need for additional officers and the sub-stations in our communities. The need stated was not just a spit in the wind. It is needed, because of town growth.

That concern met would mean we could call the office of the police sub-station and talk to our officers. When those officers are continually assigned to our neighborhood, and we get to know them, then they will not be walking into a situation where they do not know the people involved and there is a less risk of arresting the wrong person for any trouble started or continued.

Have you called the non-emergency number for the police? Where is the police station located, if you do want to go in and talk to an officer in person? How long do you have to wait?

Problems here.

The comment has been made that a lot of people hang up on the dispatchers. When you call the non-emergency number, you will see why they would. Call it, and see for yourself.

I could answer all the above questions that I asked, but we do not need the dispatchers. If we have a serious problem, then why do we have to go through a lists of options, and why cannot we talk directly to an officer without a dispatcher putting in an opinion and getting all bent out of shape about anything that is called in?

Where is the communication gap? Why cannot every citizen call in, and make a short call and express a need for safety, etc.? And we be treated with dignity and respect and each call be as important as anything eles in this town? Shortfall on good manners and communication skills on PD dispatcher part, no doubt.

We have some of the greatest officers in the world. I know we do. Why cannot they be available to us, when we need them?

Do we really need the "middle men/women"? I think not.

(Report Comment)
Delcia Crockett June 22, 2012 | 5:37 p.m.

@John Schultz:

I went to the CPD web page, not too long ago, and there was a place for voluntter contact, or something along that line. I was not interested in volunteering at the time,so I did not read in detail - but volunteers do make this town move - and that would be one workable solution.

Not to the extent of carrying a weapon, or having authority to make a decision on arrest - but to help keep peace until an officer could arrive - or that would fully cooperate with the police to follow their directives in handling any/all.

Volunteers could most certainly be trained to help the police - trained by the police themselves - as to how and when they could help keep the peace.

I think sometimes the neighborhood groups are just gossip fests and they make the problems bigger by adding in and extending them longer - and they sometimes tend to take sides with one party or the other so that one person is thumped on and hurt through their activities. Instead of solving problems, they enable them and egg them on. It must just be way too much fun for them, and they cannot stop.

The volunteers trained by the police could work with the additional 42 officers provided and the sub-stations would make our community access to law enforcement safer for us all.

Columbia go dry, and we get rid of the inconvenience of the dispatchers, and get the 42 officers and sub-staions.

About time.

(Report Comment)
Delcia Crockett June 22, 2012 | 5:46 p.m.

@p.s. We already are a dry town...After I finished some chain saw work last night I popped open a cold beer and turned the sprinklers on to try and combat the dryness!

Ha, ha, ha....

Rain will take care of that. And, know you are smart enough not to drink and drive, or to get in a fight or hurt anyone when you drink.

Seriously, one of the things I mentioned today - is that I took a self-defense course in Texas with the police. It was free and a church provided the gym for the classes. Several men oficers showed up for the instruction. We warmed up with basketball exercise, and then went into the lessons.

I was wondering if CPD gives classes of this sort for the women in this town. It might make the difference in a life-and-death situation, or - at least - help someone not get hurt, at some point.

I know that if someone gets close enough to me, I can take them down, and I am a short, little person. If someone points a gun at me, from a distance, I am not going to have a chance - but if/when they get close enough, I have been trained by some expert police officers who were very concerned about women safety near Houston.

Do we have that option here - to take those classes with the police?

(Report Comment)
Ray Shapiro June 23, 2012 | 1:22 p.m.

("John Schultz June 22, 2012 | 4:44 p.m.
"However, I expect them to see volunteers as a risk and a liability that could not be overcome by warm bodies.")

They don't need just warm bodies. They have enough of those to send over to the judicial and penal system.
However, I wonder if Joint Communications would avoid using volunteers because of quasi-union policies or they are just not competent to recruit, train and manage "unpaid professionals."
(I'm thinking along the character of volunteer firefighters, not recently released felons assigned to community service by their parole officer.
And a decent volunteer recruiting, training, management department.)

(Report Comment)

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