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'Missour-ee' or 'Missour-uh'? Let us know how you pronounce it

Sunday, October 14, 2012 | 6:00 a.m. CDT

COLUMBIA — The New York Times visited Columbia to ask the very political question: Is it "Missour-uh" or "Missour-ee"?

How do you pronounce Missouri? Let us know in the comments below.


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Comments

Ann Edwards October 14, 2012 | 7:22 a.m.

Missour ee

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James Krewson October 14, 2012 | 7:41 a.m.

Most dictionaries show both pronunciations as being acceptable. I say it both ways depending on the circumstances. If I am visiting my kids in Southeast Missouri, I usually use the -uh to match the locals down there. When I am in Columbia, I tend to use the -ee ending. But generally I say that I go with -ee about 75%, and the -uh about 25%. Not sure if that clears things up. :)

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Michael Williams October 14, 2012 | 9:31 a.m.

"Missour-uh" for me in almost all applications. One exception: It's the Missour-ee River.

I also say "I'd like a pop" rather than "I'd like a soda." I've noticed that those in-and-east of Columbia use the latter, while west of these parts use the former. I don't know why. I normally avoid the problem entirely by ordering a root beer.

I bet you could draw a N/S line less than 2 miles wide on who supports the Cardinals and who supports the Royals in this state. It wouldn't be a straight line, but the division is quite sharp, imo.

(Report Comment)
Michael Williams October 14, 2012 | 9:33 a.m.

PS: Since the paywall, I see this place has returned to "sleepytown" again.

I don't know if the newspaper considers that an asset or a liability.

(Report Comment)
Paul Godfrey October 14, 2012 | 2:53 p.m.

I was once told by a person in the National Archives, that missour-uh was the correct way, as it comes from a sub-tribe of the Cherokee Nation. I pronounce it both ways, depending upon the situation.

Paul Godfrey

(Report Comment)
frank christian October 15, 2012 | 6:28 a.m.

Mike W. - I had always understood that farmers required a "cold sody" on a warm day.

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