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Columbia Missourian

FROM READERS: Knowing the difference between a squat and a hunker — a hidden talent

By JOE DILLARD/MISSOURIAN READER
January 24, 2013 | 8:00 a.m. CST
Dillard demonstrates the difference between squatting and hunkering. To squat, place your right buttock on top of your right heel. To hunker, lower your bum as low as you can, touching the back of both heels.

Joe G. Dillard, a longtime Columbia resident, recently published his first book, "A Full Cup of Joe," a humorous autobiography of his funny life experiences thus far.

Lots of folks have hidden talents such as belching the alphabet in a single breath, rubbing their belly with one hand while patting their head with the other, singing in the shower, playing The Star-Spangled Banner by blowing on a blade of grass, etc.

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Well, my hidden talent is a little more mundane. I demonstrate the difference between a squat and a hunker (see illustration above).

I first started doing this  at the end of workshops that I used to give. Since the participants weren’t paying attention during the talk, at the end I told them that I was going to give them a take-home message and showed them the difference between a squat and a hunker.

Most of them have long since forgotten the workshop, but I bet they remember the difference between a squat and a hunker.

The most unique thing about this “hidden talent” is that I can still do it at age 75 — without the aid of mechanical devices — although it is getting a wee bit harder to get back up again!

Please do not practice this “talent” at home without a paramedic and maybe a physical therapist nearby!

Happy squatting or hunkering; at least now you know which one you are doing.

Now that you know what my hidden talent is, what’s yours? 

This story is part of a section of the Missourian called From Readers, which is dedicated to your voices and your stories. We hope you'll consider sharing. Here's how. Supervising editor is Joy Mayer.