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Oklahoma pharmacy seeks Missouri license for execution drug

Monday, February 3, 2014 | 7:00 p.m. CST; updated 7:25 p.m. CST, Monday, February 3, 2014

ST. LOUIS — An Oklahoma compounding pharmacy linked to Missouri's new lethal injection drug is seeking a license to do business in the neighboring state.

KWMU-FM reported Monday that The Apothecary Shoppe of Tulsa requested licensure in both Missouri and Texas in a Jan. 13 letter to the Oklahoma State Board of Pharmacy.

Missouri laws allow the state to keep the identity of its execution drug supplier confidential, but the public radio station and attorneys for a Missouri man put to death last week say they have used public records to identify the Oklahoma pharmacy as the supplier.

An Apothecary Shoppes spokeswoman told The Associated Press the licensing request was related to a business restructuring. She declined to discuss the company's possible role in Missouri executions.

Compounding pharmacies custom-mix drugs for individual clients and are not subject to oversight by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, though they are regulated by states.

Missouri and other states had used a three-drug execution method for decades, but pharmaceutical companies stopped selling the drugs in recent years for use in executions. Missouri eventually switched to pentobarbital, which was used to execute serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin in November, Allen Nicklasson in December and Herbert Smulls on Jan. 29.

State corrections officials have testified that its execution drug was obtained legally by a top prison administrator who went to Oklahoma to obtain the supply, making the Missouri licensing issue moot.


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