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Got yogurt? U.S. Olympians don't

Thursday, February 6, 2014 | 8:48 p.m. CST

ALBANY, N.Y. — American athletes in Sochi are facing breakfast without their team-sponsoring Greek yogurt, thanks to a bureaucratic web of international trade negotiations.

Team USA sponsor Chobani, which is based in upstate New York, said it has 5,000 cups of Greek yogurt sitting in a refrigerated warehouse waiting to be flown to the Olympic village. But Russian authorities say the U.S. Department of Agriculture has refused to provide a certificate that is required for dairy products under its customs rules.

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer, D–N.Y., and a big booster of the state's burgeoning Greek yogurt industry, this week implored the Russians to snip the red tape and let the shipment through. He said export trade rules should have nothing to do with it, since the yogurt isn't for sale and is to be eaten only by U.S. citizens in Sochi.

"Chobani yogurt is safe, nutritious and delicious, and the Russian authorities should get past 'nyet' and let this prime sponsor of the U.S. Olympic team deliver their protein-packed food to our athletes and media workers," Schumer said in a statement Tuesday.

As of Thursday, the situation remained at an impasse.

The Russian Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance put out a statement that said U.S. authorities failed to provide a veterinary certificate required by Russia and other members of the Customs Union, an economic grouping that also includes Belarus and Kazakhstan.

"The presence of such certificate accompanying each shipment of imported products is required by Russian law," it said. "For milk and dairy products... it's Certificate No. 28."

The Russian agency said U.S. officials refused to use the certificate for the shipment to Sochi, saying such a move could have a negative impact on future trade talks.

Schumer's office said the certificate required a statement that no cattle in the U.S. have any of a long list of diseases, which he said would be impossible to confirm. None of the diseases are related to food safety, a Schumer aide said.

A USDA spokeswoman said the agency is trying to work out an acceptable solution to allow the Chobani shipment.

"We strongly urge Russia to help our U.S. company resolve this issue expeditiously so that our Olympic athletes have access to these products," said the USDA's Courtney Rowe.

On Wednesday, Chobani became the third U.S. Olympic Committee sponsor to explicitly condemn Russia's so-called anti-gay law this week.

"It's disappointing that in 2014 this is still an issue," said Chobani's CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya.

Associated Press writers Vladimir Isachenkov from Moscow and Mary Clare Jalonick in Washington contributed to this story.


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