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WHAT OTHERS SAY: It's about time to curb NSA overreach

Thursday, April 3, 2014 | 6:00 a.m. CDT

The White House and a bipartisan Congress finally appear to be moving in the right direction with plans to end mass telephone data collection by the National Security Agency.

If implemented properly, the plans will answer the main criticisms of the NSA program by ending the mass capture of all U.S. telephone "metadata" on a daily basis, the retention of this data by the government for five years and its availability to intelligence analysts without a specific judge's order.

Telephone companies would be required to keep the metadata they collect on every call for billing and other company purposes for the 18 months already prescribed by the Federal Communications Commission but with the added requirement that they keep it in a specific form required by the federal government to facilitate accountability.

Under the president's proposal, intelligence agencies would have to get a judge's order for a specific search before they can access any of the metadata. This is clearly preferable to the House proposal that a judge grant broad access and only review a query once it had been answered by a telephone company.

The government, in searching the databases, would be limited to two "hops," meaning it could look for information on the initial suspect's number, numbers it connected with and numbers that the first "hop" batch of numbers connected with.

While that is better than previous practice, it is still a pretty large universe of numbers, representing the phone records of many American citizens. The role of the federal Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court in overseeing such searches will remain a critical safeguard.

The approach, while still sketchy, has won conditional approval from privacy advocates including the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the American Civil Liberties Union.

The proposals still have to be enacted into law this year before existing authority, known as section 215 of the Patriot Act, expires. In the process, Congress needs to review other NSA programs that have taken an expansive view of the reach of Section 215, such as the alleged mass surveillance of emails.

Copyright Charleston (S.C.) Post and Courier. Distributed by the Associated Press.


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