advertisement

Tick-bourne virus kills Oklahoma man

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 | 6:30 p.m. CDT

OKLAHOMA CITY — The state of Oklahoma says a man has died after acquiring the Heartland virus, making him the second person in the U.S. to die after coming down with the illness.

Oklahoma officials said Tuesday that the Delaware County man died recently from complications of the virus, which is found in the Lone Star tick and is likely spread through tick bites. The virus was first identified in Missouri in 2009.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said the patient who died after acquiring the virus had previous health conditions.

As of March 2014, seven other cases had been diagnosed in Missouri and Tennessee, but those patients recovered.

Symptoms of the virus include fever, fatigue, bruising easily and diarrhea. There is no vaccine or drug to prevent or treat the disease.

So far, the virus has only been found in men 50 or older who experienced the symptoms between the months of May and September.


Like what you see here? Become a member.


Show Me the Errors (What's this?)

Report corrections or additions here. Leave comments below here.

You must be logged in to participate in the Show Me the Errors contest.


Comments

Leave a comment

Speak up and join the conversation! Make sure to follow the guidelines outlined below and register with our site. You must be logged in to comment. (Our full comment policy is here.)

  • Don't use obscene, profane or vulgar language.
  • Don't use language that makes personal attacks on fellow commenters or discriminates based on race, religion, gender or ethnicity.
  • Use your real first and last name when registering on the website. It will be published with every comment. (Read why we ask for that here.)
  • Don’t solicit or promote businesses.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through. If you see something objectionable, please click the "Report comment" link.

You must be logged in to comment.

Forget your password?

Don't have an account? Register here.

advertisements