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Time sensitive

Sunday, November 14, 2004 | 12:00 a.m. CST; updated 7:00 p.m. CDT, Monday, July 21, 2008

The clock is a symbol of an artificial and arbitrary time, giving a beat to everyday life and sense to human existence. Some hurry on foot; others get angry in traffic because they’re losing precious “time.” Eventually, the vehicles of their haste turn to rust and ruin. And when careless hands forget to set a clock, the rhythm of days, nights and seasons gives sense to this word — “time.”

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A 60s Ford Mustang lies in a salvage yard on Route WW, waiting to be scrapped for parts.(Photos by Hadrien Daudet)


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Atop the tower at MU’s Memorial Union, built to honor the university’s deceased sons, stands a clock that has kept time for the campus since 1936.


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Students hurry on Ninth Street as the clock strikes 9 a.m. They have only 10 minutes to get to their next classroom.


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The graveyard of an abandoned church on Robinson Road, close to Finger Lakes State Park, is illuminated by the rising sun as the stars slowly disappear.


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Columbia residents wait out a traffic jam on Providence Road at about 7 a.m. The drive to campus is backed up most mornings from 7 to 9 a.m. The southbound lane remains relatively free until the evening, when the rush home begins.


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