advertisement

Fourth Amendment rights also extend to high schools

Thursday, May 3, 2007 | 12:00 a.m. CDT; updated 7:44 p.m. CDT, Saturday, July 19, 2008

Student rights? What are those? Imagine you’re a student at a local high school, wandering down the hallway and a police officer orders you to the ground while a drug dog sniffs you out. Is that abiding by student rights? A growing number of schools across the nation are subjecting their students to these kinds of actions. These schools are clearly violating their students’ Fourth Amendment rights.

Fourth Amendment rights are the protection of an individual’s freedoms, and — according to the Constitution — these rights should be protected. Schools have been checking backpacks, clothes and even bodily fluids, treating their own students like criminal suspects.

It’s completely ridiculous. Schools should respect and trust their students and focus on educating them rather than accusing them of illegal activities.

Schools are wrongfully violating their students’ Fourth Amendment rights, and I believe this is a huge problem. Sure, drug abuse is an issue, but violating students’ privacy is the wrong way to go about the issue. Our nation’s public schools should instead find other ways to encourage children to stay drug-free.


Like what you see here? Become a member.


Show Me the Errors (What's this?)

Report corrections or additions here. Leave comments below here.

You must be logged in to participate in the Show Me the Errors contest.


Comments

Leave a comment

Speak up and join the conversation! Make sure to follow the guidelines outlined below and register with our site. You must be logged in to comment. (Our full comment policy is here.)

  • Don't use obscene, profane or vulgar language.
  • Don't use language that makes personal attacks on fellow commenters or discriminates based on race, religion, gender or ethnicity.
  • Use your real first and last name when registering on the website. It will be published with every comment. (Read why we ask for that here.)
  • Don’t solicit or promote businesses.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through. If you see something objectionable, please click the "Report comment" link.

You must be logged in to comment.

Forget your password?

Don't have an account? Register here.

advertisements