advertisement

What I learned in school this year ... let’s see

Thursday, June 7, 2007 | 12:00 a.m. CDT; updated 3:27 p.m. CDT, Thursday, July 17, 2008

What I learned in school this year ... let’s see

Wednesday marked the last day of classes for the 2006-07 year in Columbia Public Schools, and students across the district were celebrating. A team of Missourian reporters headed out to various schools to ask: What was the most important thing you learned this year?

Benton Elementary School first-graders Caroline Stevens and Rosalind Eggener, both 7, discussed the question with whispers and hands cupped over their mouths before replying in unison.

“Math,” they said.

“Once we asked our teacher to stay and do more math instead of recess. We praised her,” Caroline said.

“All praise Mrs. Torbet,” Rosalind chimed in with a giggle and a bow.

Here are some of the responses the Missourian got from other students:

“About my inalienable rights in social studies.”

— Dolan Patterson, 15, Jefferson Junior High, ninth grade

“It would probably be how to manage my money.”

— Amaya Williams, 15, Jefferson Junior High, ninth grade

“It’s a hard question, it’s a whole year, it encompasses everything.”

— Rose Weston, 15, Jefferson Junior High, ninth grade

“How to consult with other ninth-graders and being able to hang with them.”

— Patrick Heflin, 15, Jefferson Junior High, ninth grade

“Pythons. We studied about animals so we could go to the St. Louis Zoo.”

— Brooke Pruett, 8, Russell Boulevard Elementary, second grade

“The most important thing I learned in school was that after the last day of school, if I see Ms. (Patricia) Sheehan, I’m always a Sheehan kid.”

— Nash Bott, 8, Russell Boulevard Elementary, second grade

“Geography. We learned about globes and continents and land forms and water forms.”

— Jonathan Phillips, 8, Russell Boulevard Elementary, second grade

“Social studies. We talked about strange things to help us remember it.”

— Juan Chacon, 10, Russell Boulevard Elementary School, fourth grade

“How to act in middle school.”

— Malik Baskett, 11, Thomas Benton Elementary, fifth grade

“Learning to respect each other and learning that we should be more polite to people we know and stuff like that.”

— Vaughn O’ Gorman, 9, Thomas Benton Elementary, third grade

“I think it’s math. She teaches us about backwards fractions.”

— Wayniqua Sledd, 9, Thomas Benton Elementary, third grade

“I guess about being nice and having fun.”

— Jacob Beck, 9, Thomas Benton Elementary, third grade

“Our counselor always taught us about job groups.”

— Lindsay Morrison, 9, Thomas Benton Elementary, third grade

“To do your homework, because homework is the most important part of school, besides listening. If you don’t do homework, none of your classwork pays off.”

— Janie Hellwege, 14, West Junior High, eighth grade

“I learned how to write a paper.”

— Shelby Truelove, 16, Hickman High School, sophomore

“I’ve got to keep good grades, because I figured out this year that college was important.”

— Danny Robinson, 17, Hickman High School, junior

“Time management. We’re on AUT (alternating unassigned time), and basically we have to manage whether you want to do your homework or wait and do it at home.”

— Courtney Darkow, 16, Rock Bridge High School, sophomore

“We learned a lot about different global issues, but we didn’t just learn it. We learned about how it affects us. It helped raise awareness.”

— Hillary Brown, 16, Rock Bridge High School, sophomore

“You can’t take people’s kindness for granted.”

— Quinchell Warren, 17, Rock Bridge High School, junior

“I learned how to handle time better during AUT. It’s more responsibility to do your homework, it counts more and it’s more important.”

— Kyle Pikop, 16, Rock Bridge High School, sophomore

“To have a lot of friends because when you get to high school, you get lonely and don’t know anybody. You should open up and meet new people.”

— D.J. Gardner, 17, Rock Bridge High School, junior

“You don’t know how much time you have left (referring to friends graduating and moving on).“

­— Keith Nowack, 17, Hickman High, junior

“Boys are crazy.”

— Shanna Johnson, 16, Hickman High, sophomore

“I realized about three days ago that I wasn’t doing as good as I could. ... (I need to be) doing better in school to do better for my child.”

— Kayla Ivey, 16, Douglass High, junior

“I am getting more patience with age.”

— Scotty Williams, 41, home-school communicator, Douglass High School

“Doing 12 Book Shares and going to Hannibal.”

— Grant Hamilton, 12, Grant Elementary, fifth grade

“I learned that if someone is in a fight with you, I should just walk away. ... (And) a lot of math strategies.”

— Leslie Wagner, 8, Grant Elementary, second grade

“Learning about animals.”

— Troy Mailes, 6, Grant Elementary, first grade


Like what you see here? Become a member.


Show Me the Errors (What's this?)

Report corrections or additions here. Leave comments below here.

You must be logged in to participate in the Show Me the Errors contest.


Comments

Leave a comment

Speak up and join the conversation! Make sure to follow the guidelines outlined below and register with our site. You must be logged in to comment. (Our full comment policy is here.)

  • Don't use obscene, profane or vulgar language.
  • Don't use language that makes personal attacks on fellow commenters or discriminates based on race, religion, gender or ethnicity.
  • Use your real first and last name when registering on the website. It will be published with every comment. (Read why we ask for that here.)
  • Don’t solicit or promote businesses.

We are not able to monitor every comment that comes through. If you see something objectionable, please click the "Report comment" link.

You must be logged in to comment.

Forget your password?

Don't have an account? Register here.

advertisements