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Three mid-Missouri men volunteer in Sudan [Photo]

Linemen Steve Baumgartner, left, and Jimmy Goodnight pack their gear and dehydrated food for their trip to Sudan. Baumgartner and Goodnight, along with their colleague Jamie Conrow, will work for three weeks in the village of Yei in Sudan to bring electricity to people's homes.

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Boone Electric company will send three of its employees to Sudan to bring electricity to homes in the village of Yei. The linemen, Jimmy Goodnight, Steve Baumgartner and Jamie Conrow, will spend three weeks working in harsh conditions in Sudan. On Thursday afternoon the three linemen were packing their tools in the garage of Boone Electric.

The declining Sturgeon [Video]

Sturgeon species worldwide are in decline, largely because of the same set of manmade challenges. Only one species, the shovel nose sturgeon, has survived relatively unscathed. The pallid sturgeon's fate is tied to the management of the Missouri River.

Tigers make second-half comeback to down Kangaroos [Photo]

Stefhon Hannah goes up for a shot against UMKC. Hannah made two of three attempted 3-pointers and ended the game with 13 points.

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The Missouri bench reacts to a score followed by a foul call during Tuesday night's 96-76 victory over UMKC at Mizzou Arena.

For love of the trains [Photo]

Volunteer Malcolm Epstein assists a passenger off a train at the Jefferson City station.

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A freight train passes by on the shared passenger/freight rail line between Kansas City and St. Louis.

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Volunteers like Malcolm Epstein keep the trains moving at Jefferson City’s Amtrak station

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Malcolm Epstein communicates with an incoming train by phone as fellow volunteer Grace Lansford looks on. Much of their work involves informing passengers of delays in travel.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Fishery Biologist Andy Plauck photographs the day's big catch - a wild Pallid Sturgeon. The fish, which is extremely rare, was transported to a hatchery where it will be spawned out. When the three-person Fish and Wildlife Fishery team pulls a Pallid Sturgeon out of their experimental gill nets, the fish is thoroughly documented, measured, and if it is a wild-born adult, possibly transported to a hatchery.

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Biologists Kyle Singer, left, and Jermyn Porter retrieve a 15-hook, worm-baited trout line that the USGS contractors hoped would attract pallid sturgeon. Biologist Dave Combs navigates the team as they check on the five lines they set out downriver from Huntsdale. On this day, the team pulled up just two of the much more common shovelnose sturgeon.

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In an effort to tame the mighty Missouri River, the Army Corps of Engineers has created a channelized and almost unrecognizable shell of the river's former self. While this protects farmers’ crops, the pallid sturgeon evolved over millions of years to live in a radically different environment. These notched dikes, seen from above, are part of the Corps’ effort to create habitat suitable for the pallid sturgeon and the creatures the fish feeds on.

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On a cool morning in early November, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Fishery Biologist Andy Plauck maneuvers “Big John” before a day of checking gill nets with his team.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Fishery Biologist Andy Plauck photographs the day's big catch - a wild Pallid Sturgeon. The fish, which is extremely rare, was transported to a hatchery where it will be spawned out. When the three-person Fish and Wildlife Fishery team pulls a Pallid Sturgeon out of their experimental gill nets, the fish is thoroughly documented, measured, and if it is a wild-born adult, possibly transported to a hatchery.

A nose for service [Photo]

Duke is a Newfoundland dog that is currently being trained on the Reinkemeyer family's property in St. Elizabeth. Alice Reinkemeyer and her sister Heather, right, are part of Heaven Scent Paws, an organization run by their mother Michele that provides service dogs to diabetics.

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Heaven Scent Paws is an organization that provides service dogs for diabetics. The organization is run by Michele Reinkemeyer out of her house in St. Elizabeth. The dogs are trained to sense a type 1 diabetic's blood sugar falling and can alert the diabetic before his or her blood sugar becomes life threatening. The trainers use socks that diabetics wore during crises and that keep a specific smell detectable by dogs. The socks are kept in one of the Reinkemeyer's family refigerators.

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Heather Reinkemeyer is the oldest daughter of Michele Reinkemeyer, who runs Heaven Scent Paws, an organization that provides service dogs to diabetics. Heather is part of the organization's staff. The Reikemeyers raise and train the dogs on their property in St. Elizabeth.

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Michele Reinkemeyer, right, and her daughter Alice take care of paperwork during their lunch break, before ordering food at a restaurant in St Elizabeth on January 8. Michele runs Heaven Scent Paws, an organization that provides service dogs to diabetics, out of her house in St Elizabeth. She has up to 50 dogs on her property at a time, and they are all trained there. Her daughter Alice is part of the organization's staff.

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The Heaven Scent Paws is an organization that provides service dogs for diabetics. These dogs are able to sense a type 1 diabetic's blood sugar falling and can alert the diabetic before their blood sugar levels become life-threatening.

Struggling sturgeon [Photo]

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fishery Biologist Andy Plauck photographs a hatchery-born pallid sturgeon. This fish would normally be the day's big catch, but the team also pulled up a large wild pallid sturgeon. When the three-person Fish and Wildlife Service team pulls a pallid sturgeon out of the murky water, the fish is thoroughly documented and measured, and if it is a wild-born adult, it might be moved to a hatchery.
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