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Planting Day: A visit with 'Mamma Anne'

Theresa Churchill holds some plants while speaking with Shirley Evans, also known in the community as "Mamma Anne," on Friday during Columbia Housing Authority Planting Day. CHA provides free flowers and herbs to residents to better their community.

Planting Day: Cleaning the mulch

Theresa Churchill finishes cleaning out the mulch preparing for CHA's Planting Day on Friday. She moved into Columbia Housing in November. She started pulling the weeds in November.

Planting Day: Sharing a hug

Theresa Churchill hugs "Mamma Anne" after they finish planting flowers in Churchill's garden on Friday, Planting Day. Churchill said, "When I first came to this neighborhood everyone was like, you've gotta meet 'Mamma Anne,' she's good."

Planting Day: 'Just let 'em grow'

Theresa Churchill plants one of her marigolds in her newly cleaned up garden on Planting Day. There were a few other plants in the flowerbed before she began, and "Momma Anne" said, "Just let' em grow."

Planting Day: Finishing the job

Theresa Churchill finishes planting for the day on Friday. She said that she had wanted to start a garden before, and Columbia Housing Authority's Planting Day let Churchill and and many more have that opportunity. Churchill said, "I think it helps people have a little more pride in their community."

Wei reunion

From left: Firefighter Jim Kandlik, firefighter Cole White, Yonghua Fu and her daughter Yirui Wei, and firefighter Danny Spry pose for a photo at a reunion between the firefighters and Wei on May 21. Wei nearly drown last June and these firefighters saved her life.

Key to the City

Julia Ames, left, and two of her friends leave City Hall after waiting for the artwork's lights to turn on May 20.

COLT Employee radio

COLT worker Eric Gooding talks on the radio with the conductor during a freight shipment between Centralia and Columbia on Thursday, May 13. Gooding is the newest employee at COLT, a Columbia owned freight line.

COLT train tracks

A freight car passes through Centralia during a shipment to Columbia on Thursday, May 13.

COLT employees talk

COLT Railroad employees Shane Riley and Matthew Sabath go through paperwork before heading out for the morning's shipments on Thursday, May 13. COLT employs a small team of 6 full-time and temporary employees to run and maintain the freight rails in Columbia.

COLT Train

A COLT Railroad engine awaits the day's shipments on Thursday, May 13. COLT Railroad is a city owned entity that moves freight in and around Columbia and the surrounding communities.

SWAT Burton press conference

Columbia Chief of Police Kenneth Burton gave a statement to the public and answered questions on Thursday related to SWAT activity earlier this year. The police will invest in eight new helmet cameras costing about $300 each so every future SWAT entry can be reviewed. "We are trying to go above and beyond to make sure this doesn't happen again," Burton said.

City Council approves Farmer's Market expansion

Paula Nolan buys strawberries at Thursday's grand opening of a new Columbia Farmers' Market location in the parking lot of Forum Boulevard Christian Church. Nolan said: "I wasn't sure if I was going to come out due to the rain, but it's only three minutes (away from home). It's really great for us over here."

Farmer's Market opens satellite locations

Paula Nolan bought her fresh lettuce from Tammy Sellmeyer on the grand opening, Thursday, at Farmers' Market's second location. The new location, at Forum and Nifong, is in the Forum Boulevard Christian Church parking lot.

Callaway Nuclear Power Plant safety

Since 2005, there have been at least 17 documented cases of alleged discrimination at the Callaway Nuclear Generating plant, according to Nuclear Regulatory Commission documents acquired under the Freedom of Information Act.

Farmers must wait for fields to dry out before planting more

Recent rainfall levels have put the corn growth behind schedule because the soil is too saturated. Planting corn from this date on can decrease the overall yield by 25 percent, said Bill Wiebold, MU plant sciences professor. If farmers have to wait until June to plant corn, he said, the yield decreases even more.

Rain might be too much for corn crops

This corn, at John Forsee’s farm in Hartsburg has been submerged because of the rising water table from the recent rain. Hartsburg resident Wayne Hilgedick said, "When the river is up a long time, like it has been, then the seep water just comes up." Hilgedick said that some of the corn will drown, and it’s almost too late to replant.

Missionary work in Kazakhstan

Scott Parsons dressed like a doctor at the orphanage. "It was flu season, and we had to be extra cautious to make sure that the kids do not get sick," he said.

Pinkel becomes face of motocycle safety

MU football coach Gary Pinkel has become the new poster child for motorcycle safety. He will appear in a series of ads for the Missouri Coalition for Roadway Safety's "Share the Road" campaign.

Rukus Ball roll raises money for gifted program

Duncan Galen, 12, climbs out of a Rukus Ball that is held by Scott Troske during a fundraiser for Columbia Public Schools' gifted program Tuesday evening at Cosmo-Bethel Park. After Superintendent Chris Belcher rolled down the hill, children at least 12 years old were able to have a turn.
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