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On guard against fraud

Shirley Shupp sits in her Houston apartment in late December and talks about how she called Medicare to report receiving medical equipment she never asked for. Shupp contacted her local Senior Medicare Patrol, which did its own research and then referred the matter to investigators. The equipment, worth thousands of dollars, was returned, the case was handed over to prosecutors and the perpetrators were charged with Medicare fraud.

AdMob founder's company to be bought by Google

Omar Hamoui, Founder and CEO of AdMob, laughs as he works at his company's offices in San Mateo, Calif., on Dec. 8, 2009.

Connecticut author collects misfit words

Cheshire Town Historian and author Ron Gagliardi has written a book titled "Noah's Desktionary and Allmanack."

Navy quarterback Ricky Dobbs

Navy quarterback Ricky Dobbs, right, runs the ball in this year's game against Army

Navy Midshipmen

Missouri men's basketball player Marcus Denmon vs. UMKC

Missouri's Marcus Denmon defends against UMKC's Bakari Lewis on Wednesday night at Mizzou Arena. Denmon scored 14 points for the Tigers in a 91-57 victory.

Square for credit cards

In this Dec. 18 photo, Willo O'Brien demonstrates Square on her iPhone in San Francisco. Willo is a designer and illustrator that uses Square for credit card transactions with her customer. Using a Square is pretty simple. Swipe a credit card through a slit on the cube's side, and it will read your credit card number, translate it into an audio signal and send it onto the iPhone, where it is encrypted. Software decodes the signal and the information is sent out over a cell phone network so the purchase can be authorized. Once the transaction goes through, the costumer's credit card data is deleted. Users can sign for purchases by writing with a finger on the iPhone's touch screen.

Square in action

Willo O'Brien demonstrates Square on her iPhone in San Francisco. Using a Square is pretty simple. Swipe a credit card through a slit on the cube's side and it will read your credit card number, translate it into an audio signal and send it onto the iPhone, where it is encrypted.

Poetic duty

Walter Bargen has served as Missouri's first poet laureate for two years. He is shown here in MU's Ellis Library.

Pregame Playmakers

Surveying the damage

A Columbia firefighter speaks with Deanne Calvert at a property owned by Calvert's brother in-law, Joseph Calvert, as fire crews work to put out a fire early Wednesday afternoon. Joseph Calvert, who lives in Springfield, rented out the property. The house had been vacant for a month.

Fighting a fire

Columbia firefighters cut ventilation holes into the roof of a home on Eastwood Circle early Wednesday afternoon. The home, owned by Springfield resident Joseph Calvert, had been empty for a month.

SWAT team member stands down after standoff

A SWAT team member, dressed in a camouflage suit, walks away from the scene of a police standoff Wednesday afternoon.

Man suspected of vehicle theft apprehended

Members of the SWAT team search the second of two suspects apprehended after a police standoff Wednesday afternoon on Quail Drive. Columbia resident Cody Baker reported their location to the police.

Calculated doses

This Oct. 26 photo shows Tshwane District Hospital pharmacist Nomvula Tshabalala, left unseen, holding HIV medication while explaining the dosage to a patient in Pretoria, South Africa.

Listening to instructions

This Oct. 26 photo shows Tshwane District Hospital pharmacist Nomvula Tshabalala, right, listening to an unidentified patient as she explains how to take medication in Pretoria, South Africa. The hospital is on the front lines of a new battle emerging in the fight against HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, home to two-thirds of the world's 33 million HIV cases. They once struggled with a lack of medicines to treat people, watching patients simply waste away, but now they wrangle with the consequences of good deeds gone wrong: The drugs that once worked so well are no longer working. Drug resistance rates have shot up from 1 percent or 2 percent to as high as 30 percent in just the past few years in Africa.

Looking for better solutions

This Oct. 27 photo shows Patience Kweza examining Mashamaite, left, a 4-year-old boy recently switched to second-line drugs after becoming resistant to the first regimen as his unidentified stepmother looks on at the Tshwane District Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, where the drugs only started arriving a few years ago, resistance is partly the unforeseen consequence of good intentions. There are not enough drugs to go around, so clinics run out and patients can't do full courses. The inferior meds available in Africa poison other patients. Misprescriptions are common and monitoring is scarce.

Fire damages home

Fire damage extends to the exterior of a house on Dickinson Court from where Columbia fire officials think the fire originated. Columbia Fire Department officials said damages are estimated to be $150,000.

Arson suspected

The remnants of a home gym that was destroyed in an early morning fire in a home on Dickinson Court are just a minor part of the damage caused by the fire. The Columbia Fire Department thinks the fire was set intentionally and that the home was burglarized.

Problems with drugs in pig

This Aug. 24 photo shows Russ Kremer with one of his piglets on his farm in Frankenstein. Kremer, whose leg was gored by the tusk of a boar, ended up with a strep infection that two months of multiple antibiotics did nothing to heal. Finally, Kremer figured out the answer, it was flowing in the veins of the boar. The boar had been fed low doses of penicillin, which made it resistant to most antibiotics, and the drug-resistant germ passed to Kremer. The farmer was nearly killed by modern-day farming. And more and more, other Americans, many of them living far from barns and pastures, are similarly at risk.
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