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Photo

A year-round snowman

Shane Brockman, left, gets advice from the Paquin Tower recreation ceramics instructor, Anna Meyer, about his snowman ceramic figure. "If you want to use it year round," Meyer suggested, "then avoid using green and red together."

Painting ceramics

Helen Sherrod, a Columbia school bus driver, left, and her mother, Fausta Morales, paint their ceramics at Paquin Tower on Feb. 2. Sherrod planned to fix and antique Santa's moustache after she finished painting his beard.

Grinding the stones

Vernon Barr, 92, of the Central Missouri Rock and Lapidary Club polishes a leopardskin agate as part of the group's instructional event on Saturday near Midway as wife, Jeanne, reads in the background. The Barrs have belonged to the club since 1965. "I dearly love to go hunting for rocks but I don't do anything. Vernon does the lapidary part — it's noisy and messy," Jeanne said.

Result of hard work

Vernon Barr displays a leopardskin agate that he polished and fitted with a buckle during the Central Missouri Rock and Lapidary Club meeting Saturday. The agate started as a slab and was ground and polished by Barr within a matter of hours.

A new Day in MU tennis

MU freshman Danielle Day poses for a portait after several hours practicing her game. Day was home-schooled throughout middle school and high school, so being on a campus is unique for her. Of the many adjustments Day has made, playing on a team is one that she said she has most enjoyed. Day played junior tournaments in Florida but was never on a high school team.

Camaraderie and tennis

Danielle Day, an MU freshman, returns the ball to a teammate during practice on January 27. She started playing tennis at the age of eight and is originally from Tampa, Fla. Day is majoring in broadcast journalism. Day said she enjoys playing tennis here and her teammates are a part of that reason. "I just really want to do well for the team and myself," she said.

How to handle a horse

Horse therapy trainer Jessica Fry shares a laugh with one of the Coyote Hill residents during a discussion about how difficult it is to bridle a horse.

Advice on horses

Horse therapy trainer Jessica Fry gives a young Coyote Hill resident some helpful advice before a training session begins.

Goats, because the kids like them

Three goats warm themselves in front of the red barn on the Coyote Hill property. "The goats don't do anything. We just got them because the kids like them," said executive director and founder Larry McDaniel.

Boone Life photo column: "A place to be a child"

One of the residents of Coyote Hill tries some soft words and a gentle pat on Roy the horse's head in an effort stop his stubbornness and get him to go for a walk during a session of horse therapy. Coyote Hill is a foster home set on a 155-acre farm near Harrisburg.

Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church

Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church, 702 Wilkes Blvd.: Constructed in 1917, the church was built for workers of the Hamilton-Brown Shoe Co. The church originally featured a red tile roof, which has since been replaced. Additions were made in 1944 and 1961, with the main entrance being designed by local architect John Hurst. The church is owned by Wilkes Boulevard UMC Inc.

Exploring the new fire station

Firefighter Rich Harris helps Elisha Bender, 6, down from a fire truck after an exploratory walk-through at the grand opening of Columbia Fire Station No. 7 on Sunday.

JJ at the fire station

A Chihuahua named J.J. listens to speeches with owners Nancy Hadfield and Rich Hadfield, right, at the opening of Columbia's Fire Station No. 7 on Sunday. Rich Hadfield joked that he thought about adding black and white spots to J.J. before they arrived at the celebration.

St. Clair Hall at Columbia College

St. Clair Hall at Columbia College, 1001 Rogers St.: The Elizabethan-style building was constructed in 1900 and features symmetrical towers as well as multiple gables and dormers. It was named in memory of Luella St. Clair’s husband, Frank, during her term as president of the college. The building originally housed administrative offices and classrooms and served as a student dormitory.

Hindman at the fire station

Mayor Darwin Hindman makes opening remarks to the crowd at the grand opening of Columbia's Fire Station No. 7 on Sunday.

Quarry Heights neighborhood and quarry

Quarry Heights neighborhood and quarry: Adjacent to the MKT Trail, the Quarry Heights quarry serves as a private recreation spot for residents of the Quarry Heights neighborhood. The former limestone quarry features an artificial lake for swimming. The neighborhood was formed in 1951.

Private home on Mount Vernon Avenue

Private home, 700 Mount Vernon Ave.: This colonial two-story farmhouse was built by Robert and Lura Tandy in 1911. There have been 16 owners with the longest being Josie Johnson from 1958 to 1977. Current owners Stacey and Rebecca Woelfel have found numerous objects left by previous owners, most notably a diamond ring.

Flat Branch Wastewater treatment plant

Old Flat Branch wastewater treatment plant, now Audubon Society of Columbia's Trailside Nature Center, 800 S. Stadium Blvd.: Built by the Works Progress Administration in 1939, the Flat Branch wastewater treatment plant served Columbia residents until its sewage was diverted to the new regional facility in 1983. Today, the small two-story brick building south of Stadium Boulevard near the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial at Battle Garden houses the Columbia Audubon Society's Trailside Nature Center and public restrooms.

Missouri Press Association building

Missouri Press Association building, 802/804 Locust St.: Built in the late 1920s, the building has served as the headquarters for the Missouri Press Association since 1969. Notable members of the association include Walter Williams, who founded the Missouri School of Journalism in 1908 and served as president of the university from 1931 to 1935. The building features many architectural qualities of the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, which was constructed about the same time.

State Highway Maintenance Building

State Highway Maintenance Building, 900 N. Old 63: The Missouri State Highway Department built the structure in 1928 to serve as a maintenance building. It is made of brick and is an example of 1920s industrial architecture. The building is owned by Elizabeth Goldenhirsch.
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