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Singing for faith

Thomas Jackson, 6, sings with his Sunday School teacher Christine Martin at the Family Worship Center in November. The church's pastors and volunteers were willing to be trained to work with children with autism, such as Thomas.

Quiet time with family

Thomas Jackson, 6, and his sister, Malinda Jackson, 5, draw during Sunday school classes at the Family Worship Center. Their mother, Kimberly Matthews, decided on attending Family Worship Center because it fit well for Thomas, who is autistic.

A place for laughs

Lydia Mattingley, 8, laughs as her grandmother Paula Mattingley paints her nose black at the Missouri Children's Museum on Tuesday. The museum has different stations in its layout, including arts and crafts, building blocks, a doctor's office and face painting.

Painting for Mom

Delaney Coyle, 3, paints a picture for her mother, Kristen, at the Missouri Children's Museum on Tuesday. "She's not a big painter at home, so it's fun to see her do something different here," Kristen said. "We're a fan of children's museums, so it's nice to have one here."

Let them shine

Artist and Director of Operations Reji White works on a section of the mural in the front entryway of the Missouri Chidren's Museum on Tuesday. He sees the murals as a chance to show the children a wide variety of animals, as well as another opportunity to paint. "None of this was how I planned it, but it really turned out better than we expected," he said. Reji emphasized his love for working at the museum, being able to see kids shine and have a good time. "I want to do this for my whole life."

From farmhouse to learning zone

Visitors play in the Missouri Children's Museum, located off Interstate 70 in a 105-year-old farmhouse. Formerly a furniture store, the new museum encourages young children to explore a wide variety of hands-on activities under their parents' supervision.

Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel speaks at the 2009 Texas Bowl press conference

Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel speaks to reporters Tuesday in Houston about the Tigers' game Thursday against Navy in the 2009 Texas Bowl.

Waiting for security

Passengers at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport prepare to go through security Monday. Various levels of elevated security and restrictions at airports and aboard airliners led to confusion Monday about what passengers could or couldn’t do during flights in the wake of an attempted Christmas Day terror attack.

Missouri women's basketball player Amanda Hanneman vs. North Texas

Missouri's Amanda Hanneman defends against North Texas' Denetra Kellum on Monday night in the Tigers' victory at Mizzou Arena.

Missouri women's basketball player Toy Richbow vs. North Texas

Missouri's Toy Richbow drives down court Monday night in the Tigers' victory over North Texas.

Controlling expired treatments

This Aug. 27, 2009, photo shows stacks of expired malaria medication in an NGO's village office near Pailin, Cambodia.

Working for a cure

This Aug. 28, 2009, photo shows malaria researcher Sornsuda Setaphan preparing blood samples at the hospital in Pailin, Cambodia. Malaria parasites in the Thai-Cambodia area of Pailin, Cambodia, have become resistant to Artemisinin-based therapies, according to nongovernmental agencies working in the region. If this drug stops working, there's no good replacement to combat a disease that kills 1 million annually. As a result, earlier this year international medical leaders declared resistant malaria here a health emergency.

Drug resistance growing

This Aug. 26, 2009, photo shows patients suffering from malaria being treated at the hospital in Pailin, Cambodia. This spot on the Thai-Cambodian border is home to a form of malaria that keeps rendering one powerful drug after another useless. This time, scientists have confirmed the first signs of resistance to the only affordable treatment left in the global medicine cabinet for malaria: Artemisinin. If this drug stops working, there's no good replacement to combat a disease that kills 1 million annually.

Malaise from malaria

This Aug. 29, 2009, photo shows Chhay Meth, 9, suffering through an attack of malaria at the family's home in O'treng village on the outskirts of Pailin, Cambodia. This spot on the Thai-Cambodian border is home to a form of malaria that keeps rendering one powerful drug after another useless. This time, scientists have confirmed the first signs of resistance to the only affordable treatment left in the global medicine cabinet for malaria: Artemisinin. If this drug stops working, there's no good replacement to combat a disease that kills 1 million annually. As a result, earlier this year international medical leaders declared resistant malaria here a health emergency.

A quiet moment

Barbara Willis takes a moment out of her busy schedule to check on her dog, Sydney, in her office located in Lowry Hall at MU. Sydney, a golden retriever-rottweiler mix, was adopted from the Central Missouri Humane Society seven years ago by Willis and was trained to sense when humans are going to have a migraine.

Learning to serve

Tara stands watch over her owner, Noah Hartsfield, while he works at his desk in Lowry Hall. Tara, a German shepherd-Labrador retriever mix, was adopted from the Central Missouri Humane Society and is in training as a service dog for Hartsfield.

On duty

Service dog, Sydney, hangs out next to her owner, Barbara Willis, at her office in Lowry Hall on Dec. 11. Willis adopted Sydney from the Central Missouri Humane Society seven years ago and trained her to alert Willis of migraine attacks sometimes 30 minutes before they happen. Willis also jokes with students to not show up to her classes hungover because Sydney will tell on them.

Saying goodbye before a flight

Donna Palmeter, left, and her daughter Jessica Furse, right, say their goodbyes at the Columbia Regional Airport on Sunday. Despite an attempted terror attack on a Northwest Airlines flight on Christmas Day, Furse and her husband still chose to fly from their home in Atlanta. "They feel pretty secure," Palmeter said.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon

Praying for peace

Carolyn Mathews, right, leads attendees of the "Remembering Gaza: A Prayer for Peace" memorial group in song on Sunday.
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