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MU vet school’s annual open house draws diverse crowd

Danny Raber, left, and Scott Morrison are accompanied by Bud the Dalmatian on the Budweiser Clydesdale cart that circled the MU College of Veterinary Medicine grounds during the college's open house on Saturday. Morrison travels with the Clydesdales all over the country and has been driving them for 13 years.

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Tony Hoard, a Purina Incredible Dog team trainer for two years, guides two-time world champion Rory Dean to catch a frisbee as part of the show during the MU College of Veterinary Medicine's open house on Saturday.

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Rory Dean, a two-time world champion acrobatic Australian Shepard, catches a frisbee thrown by his trainer, Tony Hoard, at the Purina Incredible Dog Show on Saturday, held during the MU College of Veterinary Medicine's open house.

'Objects of Affection' student art exhibit inspired by nostalgia

A detail from Forys' art piece "Out on a Limb." The exhibition's wistful desire for the past is influenced by Forys' late grandmother.

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Forys' artwork consists of mixed media. She creates paintings and cloth sculptures, rips them, and then fills them with sand and straw.

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Paintings and sculptures from Jessica Forys' exhibition "Objects of Affection" line the walls at Orr Street Studios on April 4.

Controversial Last Supper art removed from museum

A visitor looks at artworks by Austrian artist Alfred Hrdlicka on display at the diocesan museum in Vienna.

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Seminar aimed at helping churches quell congregational arguments

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A shell gorget with a jaguar engraved on it is exhibited on Feb. 25 at the Museum of Art and Archaeology at MU. The gorget, estimated to be about 2,000 years old, was discovered in Fairfield Mound 2 in Benton County, by Ray Wood and is part of the “Before Columbus” exhibit at the museum.

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Ray Wood looks at the Fairfield Gorget, an ornament made from conch shell engraved with an elaborate jaguar, at the Museum of Art and Archaeology at MU. Wood and Rolland Pangborn found the gorget in 1958.

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This Mexican anthropomorphic figure depicts a hunchback with a staff. Hunchback figures were prominent in Mesoamerican art beginning around the 12th century B.C. This figure and the following artifacts are on display at MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology.

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This spouted vessel depicts a ceremonial scene and is topped with a human figure who is surrounded by five attendants.

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This Peruvian painted pottery vessel depicts fish, lobster and other sea animals. A small stone frog is attached to the side of the pot.

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Figures of musicians adorn this double-chambered Peruvian whistling vessel. The Lambayeque people, best known for their metal and gold work, also created stone masterpieces such as this whistle.

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This Peruvian plume was probably used as either a simple fan or as a headdress to mark the importance of an individual. Its exact purpose is unknown.

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This Peruvian textile fragment shows warriors with weapons and trophy heads. Ancient people from the Midwest might have produced textiles, too, but organic materials tend to decompose in the Missouri climate.

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Alex W. Barker, left, director of the Museum of Art and Archaeology at MU, left, has a conversation with Ray Wood about the gorget with a jaguar engraved on it.

Tigers senior sets career home run, RBI records

Missouri sophomore left fielder Aaron Senne swings at a pitch delivered during the first inning of the Tiger's game against William Woods University on Wednesday. Missouri won the game 16-9.

Third shot's the charm?

Drake University student Mandi McClue gets a mumps immunization shot from Polk County Health nurse Lori Parsons. Most of the college students who got the mumps in a big outbreak in 2006 had received the recommended two vaccine shots, according to a study that raises questions about whether a new vaccine or another booster shot is needed.
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