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Last day of school through principals’ eyes

Parkade Elementary Principal Betsy Baker says goodbyes after school let out for the summer on Tuesday. After 12 years as principal at Parkade, Baker is retiring. "Today has been a lot harder than I thought," Baker said.

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Deb Barksdale stands amid a flurry of cards from her students that she received on her birthday in September. Barksdale is retiring this year from Benton Elementary School.

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Nyle Klinginsmith is retiring as principal at Jefferson Junior High School.

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Linda Klopfenstein is retiring as principal at Midway Heights Elementary School.

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Tarry Parish is retiring as assistant principal at Lange Middle School.

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Daniel Roe, 54, was arrested on suspicion of first-degree assault and armed criminal action in connection with a stabbing Tuesday night, Columbia police said.

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Parker Naylor walks around his property on I-70 Drive N.E., in Columbia, Mo., Wednesday, June 4, 2008. He envisions his property to be a commercially developed area in a decade. A little north of his property is a site for a new high school. Before the area is developed and more people to come around, he wants to make sure all parts of his property are in good shape. He has been watching a healthy red hawk died suddenly, a stumbling deer, and a lot of mosquitoes around the area where a thousand of 3-decade-old tires have been dumped.

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STEVEN WEINMAN/Missourian
Illegally dumped tires sit in storage space at Drew Anderson's Cosmo Self Storage in Columbia in May, 2008. Missouri Department of Natural Resources inspector Jacob Cross estimates that there are more than 900 tires present.

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STEVEN WEINMAN/Missourian
A tire on the Naylor property in May 2008, contains a pool of water, good breeding conditions for mosiquitoes. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources estimates that this tire has been present at the dump at Naylor's home in Columbia for more than 20 years.

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Parker Naylor, on his property on I-70 Drive N.E., in Columbia, Mo., Wednesday, June 4, 2008, talks about the tires that have been illegal dumped there. A day after a rainy day, he is about mosquitoes, that could possibly carry West Nile virus, that may breed around the tires. He has owned the land since 1990 and the tires have been there more than 30 years. He is waiting for the Department of Natural Resources to send people to his property to get rid of the tires. He had expected the cleaning up work to be done last summer, but now he’s not sure if it will even get done this year.

Money will be tight again this year for Columbia

City Manager Bill Watkins answers questions after his State of the City address Wednesday morning. Watkins said he expected another tight budget year with little to know increase in revenue.

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City Manager Bill Watkins delivers his annual State of the City address on Wednesday morning. One of Watkins ideas for the coming year is to target economic development through partnerships with Regional Economic Development Partnership, Inc. and MU.

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Daniel Roe

Tight wallets in sight for Columbia residents for fiscal year 2009

City Manager Bill Watkins delivers his annual State of the City address in the City Council chambers in Columbia. The speech addressed Watkins's opinions on and recommendations for the current status of various sectors of the city's government.

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City Manager Bill Watkins delivers his annual State of the City address in the City Council chambers in Columbia. The speech addressed Watkins's opinions on and recommendations for the current status of various sectors of the city's government.

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City Manager Bill Watkins answers questions after his State of the City address Wednesday morning in the City Council Chambers in Columbia. The speech addressed Watkins's opinions on and recommendations for the current status of various sectors of the city's government.

Neighborhood Response Team expands boundaries to include Benton-Stephens, East Campus

Senior Building Inspector Brenda Candaday and Environmental Health Specialist Dave Crooks take notes on the condition of a house on Sexton Road on June 6. The two are part of the Neighborhood Response Team started by the city to check things such as peeling paint, loose gutters and unsafe living conditions.

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Environmental Health Specialist Dave Crooks records the condition of an overgrown tree on Sexton Road. Crooks is a member of the Neighborhood Response Team that sends letters to residents requesting changes be made to the exterior of their homes.

McBaine bur oak tree’s DNA to be preserved

Mark Peper, 21, cuts a qing chestnut while preparing to graft another chestnut plant to the top at MU's Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center on May 30. The process is similar to grafting bur oak trees.

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Chestnut saplings sit on the ground after being grafted. Aluminum foil is wrapped around the graft to regulate the temperature around the cut.
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