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Holden, GOP diverge on life sciences plans

Though often at odds, Gov. Bob Holden, a Democrat, and Republican legislative leaders agree on the need to boost the University of Missouri system’s life sciences. But the governor and the lawmakers have offered up two different plans for spending millions of dollars to meet the goal and have yet to coordinate their efforts.

Holden’s Jobs Now program and a bond proposal promoted by Missouri Senate President Pro Tem Peter Kinder and House Speaker Catherine Hanaway both target expansion of life sciences to create new jobs in the state. Kinder and Hanaway back a UM proposal to issue $190.4 million in bonds to build and renovate life sciences facilities. The plan would cost the state’s revenue fund $11.6 million a year for debt service beginning in 2008.

Hazardous waste funds to take a hit

JEFFERSON CITY — Dotting the Missouri landscape are the ingredients for human suffering: lead, arsenic and dioxin.

Just ask the residents of North Kansas City.

A New Stage of Work

After nearly 30 years of dancing and teaching in New York and around the world, Columbia native Alan Lynes is back, ready to tackle his newest assignment: renovating the Missouri Theatre.

With work scheduled to begin in 2005, Lynes’ main focus for the next year is raising the $8 million to $10 million needed to remodel the 1920s-era theater.

Couple to face felony abuse charge

The Hallsville couple arrested nearly two weeks ago after a horse died on their farm will be charged today with felony animal abuse, said Boone County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Connie Sullivan

Brandi and Thomas Phillips were arrested Dec. 22 after the Central Missouri Humane Society received an anonymous tip that two horses owned by the couple were severely malnourished. One of the horses died shortly after the arrival of humane society workers and deputies from the Boone County Sheriff’s Department.

WHO M I?

A driver’s attention is often grabbed by a personalized license plate.

Whether laugh-out-loud funny, mind-numbingly dumb, or bewildering and baffling, each personalized plate is unique. But having one sure isn’t.

Nurturing nature

Scott Schulte deftly weaves through the rocky terrain, sweeping past leafless branches and pausing occasionally to observe the nature that surrounds him.

He halts, listening carefully. Birds call in the cold morning air. Two deer scamper in the distance. “They must be over there,” Schulte says, pointing in the direction the deer came from.

Iowa will test Tigers’ resolve

It probably didn’t bother the Missouri men’s basketball team when 2003 ended and 2004 began.

Recent on-court struggles as well as an NCAA investigation of the program have made it a forgettable year for the No. 23 Tigers (4-4). The Tigers get a chance to begin anew, to some degree, when they host Iowa at 2 p.m. Saturday at Hearnes Center.

Tigers focused on future

SHREVEPORT, La. – Before the Independence Bowl had ended, even before it had started, the Missouri football team found it hard not to think about the future.

Striving to be their best

Everyone makes resolutions for the new year, even the Missouri women’s basketball team.

The Tigers play Miami (Ohio) at 7 tonight at Hearnes Center. It will be the first meeting between the Tigers (7-2) and the RedHawks (6-4).

Coaches tout worthy cause

Bob Burchard, the Columbia College men’s basketball coach, and Mike Davis, the Cougars’ women’s coach, love to win and hate to lose, but this weekend’s second annual Coaches vs. Cancer Holiday Classic is about more than wins and losses.

Burchard and Davis started the Classic last season because of a common concern. They both knew friends, family members and Columbia College faculty members who with cancer.

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