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House fire kills woman

The first time employees at the Humane Society of Central Missouri heard of Elouise Sipe was when they received a call Wednesday from a woman who had bought a puppy from her. The caller said her puppy died shortly after she made the purchase.

When a Humane Society investigator went to Sipe’s rural residence later that day, they found dozens of dogs with no water, not enough food and minimal shelter.

Initial talks on merger concluded

Northwest Missouri State University is one big step closer to becoming the fifth campus of the University of Missouri system.

On Thursday, the UM system Board of Curators approved a 15-point memorandum of understanding addressing some of the concerns related to bringing the Maryville school into the system. The UM system currently has four campuses — Columbia, Kansas City, Rolla and St. Louis.

Tigers hope to get back on track

Six days ago, it seemed the Missouri men’s basketball team had finally begun to piece its season together.

The Tigers had put together three consecutive strong games, going 2-1 against Oklahoma, Texas and Nebraska. A trip to Colorado on Wednesday brought all of Missouri’s problems back to the forefront, resulting in an 83-70 loss. The Buffaloes outshot, outhustled, and outplayed the Tigers.

$200 million name deal rejected

JEFFERSON CITY — A deal that would give the University of Missouri system roughly $200 million for building construction fell through Thursday morning on a technical ruling.

Sen. Ken Jacob, D-Columbia, attempted to strike a deal Wednesday night that would have given UM roughly $200 million to help finance the construction of a hotel, convention center and performing arts center on the MU campus.

Tigers hitting in-state goals for top recruits

It happens every year. A football program will target top-flight players in recruiting, usually from its home state and inevitably, some of those players will choose to go elsewhere.

There is no single reason these players pass on their home schools. Some athletes want to get away from home, the prestige and talent at major programs draw others and some want a better chance to play right away.

Detective plans to quit

Boone County Sheriff’s Detective Ken Kreigh has accused Sheriff Ted Boehm of “political subterfuge” related to an investigation of an October drug bust and said he plans to resign from the department.

Kreigh, who announced his candidacy for Boone County Sheriff last September, claimed Thursday that Boehm went against departmental policy when he convened an outside review panel to investigate an Oct. 23, 2003, drug operation.

Subdivision proposal raises concerns

Plans for a 940-home subdivision and golf course east of Columbia are taking shape, and a representative for developer Billy Sapp said neighbors will get to see drawings of the proposed development within the next few weeks.

Sapp spokesman Don Stamper said the project will have a “country club feel” and a mixture of single-family homes and condominiums.

Spates making his mark

Senior Jeremy Spates is doing his best to join the century club.

No, not that one.

Chasing Kerry, Dean takes on role of aggressor

Howard Dean supporters in central Missouri will finally get to rally for their candidate as the Vermont Governor will make a brief appearance in the St. Louis area today.

Mid-Missouri Dean campaign organizers said about 22 volunteers from Columbia and Jefferson City will attend a 2:30 p.m. town hall meeting at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park. Dean will participate in the event.

Bruins win despite coach’s absence

Rock Bridge overcame adversity to earn a difficult win against Moberly.

Bruins coach John Kopnisky was not there to see his lower weights propel the team to a 37-31 victory Thursday at Rock Bridge.

Tigers know they must win at home

Missouri can find many positives in its win against No. 20 Oklahoma on Wednesday, but perhaps the Tigers’ biggest accomplishment was earning its first home win in Big 12 Conference play.

It is a consensus among Big 12 coaches that the key to success is winning at home, but Missouri failed to do that against Kansas on Jan. 10, and Nebraska on Jan. 14.

MLK views frame events

The Rev. Martin Luther King began his quest for civil rights for all Americans a half century ago. This week, MU is revisiting King’s legacy and discussing his past and future influence on American public policy.

On Thursday, MU hosted two events that focused on education and public policy. The Rev. L. Charles Stovall, a former King colleague and United Methodist Church leader from Texas, played a key role in both presentations.

Hitting the books

When the five seniors on Missouri men’s swimming and diving team were named to the Academic All-Big 12 Conference team last year, it was no surprise to coach Brain Hoffer.

“We have a couple of guys that if they don’t make a 4.0 (grade point average) we’re surprised,” Hoffer said. “They’re a lot more than just swimmers.”

Tigers focus on long-term goals

Winning was one of the last things on Missouri track coach Rick McGuire’s mind when his team hosted Kansas and Kansas State last weekend.

Although Missouri finished third, McGuire said his team could have won if he had used some of his injured or tired athletes.

Construction stops due to pollution fear

Twenty-two developments — including a Wal-Mart Supercenter planned for south Columbia — are on hold while the state sits on land-disturbance permits out of fear the projects could further pollute Hinkson Creek.

Hinkson Creek has been considered impaired by unknown pollutants since 1998 by the Environmental Protection Agency. While construction in the watershed has continued unabated until now, officials with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources are worried that further development could compromise the creek. Until a solution is found, land-disturbance permits are on hold.

Review clears Harvey

MU athletic department officials said Thursday that an internal review has found no evidence that Tony Harvey, assistant head coach, broke university rules by trading football and men’s basketball tickets for painting work on his house.

“We have reviewed the situation and we’ve found nothing to substantiate any of the allegations (against Tony Harvey),” said Tim Hickman, associate athletic director of business operations. “We reviewed ticket requests plus what employees purchased. I know he’s bought both football and basketball tickets.”

Festival for goddess of art

There is no formal Hindu temple in Columbia where Hariprasad Trivedi can take his 9-year-old son Aditya to learn about his religion and culture.

However, on Saturday the Knights of Columbus Hall will be transformed into a place of learning, worship and celebration that mirrors the temples of Trivedi’s native India.

Faulty wiring linked to Sturgeon fire

Investigators believe that a fire that severely damaged a Sturgeon home Thursday morning started in the ceiling and was probably caused by faulty electrical wiring.

Firefighters with the Boone County Fire Protection District responded to the blaze, at 411 W. Canada St., at around 10 a.m. The fire was under control in about 35 minutes, said Rob Brown, chief of staff for the fire protection district.

Kewps wrestlers fall

The Hickman wrestling team lost 51-15 at Kearney on Thursday.

Three Kewpies earned victories. Tony Pescaglia (112 pounds) won by default, Corry Skala (125) won by decision and Luke Harper (275) won by a fall.

Wheels roll on in bad weather

The roads may be clear, but slick sidewalks and driveways were a challenge to navigate Thursday as volunteers for the Meals on Wheels program made their rounds.

In the morning, when the temperature remained below 20 degrees, Cherie Campbell picked up four hot meals going to Meals on Wheels clients and set off on her route.

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