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Ties to Columbia Islamic agency denied

The Islamic African Relief Agency, based in Khartoum, Sudan, denied Saturday any ties to the Columbia-based Islamic American Relief Agency.

The Islamic American Relief Agency was raided by an FBI–led task force on Oct. 13. On the same day, the assets of both agencies were frozen and the agencies were listed as Specially Designated Global Terrorists by the U.S. Treasury Department. They also were accused of supporting al-Qaida, Osama bin Laden, and Hamas.

Tigers’ rushing stalled

One season after ranking sixth in the NCAA with 237.46 rushing yards per game, the Missouri football team’s rushing attack went flat with only 51 yards on 35 carries against Nebraska on Saturday.

That lack of production came after the suspension of the Tigers’ leading rusher, junior Damien Nash for disciplinary reasons following an Oct. 23 loss against Oklahoma State. Freshman Tony Temple played in his first collegiate game against Nebraksa, gaining only 13 yards on six carries. He left the contest in the fourth quarter with an injured left Achilles.

A trick for these treats: They’re off to Iraq

Two former hippies and a retired little devil dutifully unloaded 10 pounds of Halloween candy on the scale at Dr. Scott Robinson’s orthodontics office. Kelsey and Grady Harrington had braved the rain on Sunday evening sporting Afros, sunglasses and tie-dyed shirts while their younger brother Lucas donned a devil costume to collect hordes of Kit Kats, Reese’s Pieces and Laffy Taffy. The trio — Kelsey, 10, Grady, 11, and Lucas, 8 — decided on Monday to share their bounty with children halfway around the world in Iraq.

“I did it because of where it was going and because I got some money,” Grady Harrington said.

63 percent turnout expected in Mo.

JEFFERSON CITY — The forecast for Election Day: strong voter turnout expected, with chances of lines at some polling places, periods of impatience and prospects for victory too close to call in some races.

Today, Election Day 2004, is upon us at last.

Election Day sees anxious electorate

The last time the people of Anthony, Kan., chose a president, Memorial Park was a patch of grass with picnic tables and elm trees but no memorial to speak of. Rising from the earth now is a tribute to the turning point of the past four years — parts of steel beams from the World Trade Center, a block of limestone from the Pentagon, some dirt from a field near Shanksville, Pa.

Osama bin Laden is as common a household name as John Deere. The postal carrier’s son spent eight months in Iraq and might have to return. Wheat farmers at the co-op feel the pinch of soaring diesel costs. And business at the Pride of the Prairie Quilt Shoppe has collapsed as manufacturing layoffs have left customers cutting back.

A Day at the Polls

Counting ballots hours before voting even started: That’s what got four longtime election judges up at 3 this morning.

Retirees Isabell Cochran, Marjorie Koenig, Bette Faddis and Norma Falloon headed to the Harrisburg Christian Church to begin checking the number of ballots against the voter rolls before voters started arriving at 6 a.m. They are four of more than 700 judges in Boone County this year and have among them over 80 years of experience working at the polls.

Lawyers, watchers to prowl Missouri’s polls

JEFFERSON CITY— As part of an effort to protect their ticket in Missouri’s race for governor, representatives from both major parties said they have a staff of lawyers and poll watchers ready and on the lookout for dirty tricks this Election Day.

Paul Sloca, spokesman for the Missouri Republican Party, said the GOP has assembled a “rapid-response legal team” of hundreds of party workers, but declined to go into detail about his party’s legal preparations.

Bringing Bollywood to Columbia

Backstage at Jesse Auditorium on Saturday, dancers for MU’s “India Nite” fussed with their costumes, preparing for a diversity of dance performances.

A troupe of children started the entertainment by singing the national anthems of India and the United States.

Diplomat shares Cold War memories

Political science students at MU got a rare first-hand account of the end of the Cold War when the last American ambassador to the Soviet Union, Jack Matlock, visited their class Friday.

Matlock wrote “Reagan and Gorbachev: How the Cold War Ended”, in which he gives a detailed first-person account of the final days of the Cold War.

Reeling in the trout season

Mike Hanauer of Ashland has loved fishing his entire life, but he took up trout fishing just last year after he retired from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services in Jefferson City.

Instead of traveling to the trout streams of southern Missouri, Hanauer only had to drive to Cosmo-Bethel Park in south Columbia.

Kewps, Bruins eye new season

The high-pitched squeak of basketball shoes pivoting and shuffling filled the Hickman gym Monday night.

It didn’t feel like the first practice of the 2004-05 season for the Hickman girls’ basketball team.

Realism addicts video athletes

In their three years as a couple, Columbia’s Erica Ainge and Alvin Banks have gone through the same experience each fall.

To Banks, the annual August release of the best-selling “Madden” NFL videogame is like a national holiday.

Complete election results take time, manpower

JEFFERSON CITY — From the ballot box to the election returns on the evening news, the responsibility of counting each Missourian’s vote will fall upon the state’s 114 county clerks and the office of the secre-tary of state.

Individual votes are counted at the county level, where ballots are collected from each polling place and taken to a central location, usually the courthouse or a county government center.

Peterson running for Heisman

Adrian Peterson does not act or play like a freshman.

Perhaps that is why he is being mentioned as a possible Heisman Trophy winner with three games left in the regular season for No. 2 Oklahoma.

Extra Points: Cougars win season opener on road

The Columbia College women’s basketball team opened its season Monday night by beating Purdue-Calumet 74-51 in Hammond, Ind. Columbia College led the defending Chicagoland Conference champions by 13 at halftime and held on for an easy victory in the second half.

It was the seniors who led the No. 13 Cougars. Forward Mindy Mitchem led Columbia College on defense. She recorded 12 rebounds and six blocks. Four other seniors scored in double figures for the Cougars. Guard Tiffany Foote led the team with 18 points, and forward Charliss Ridley scored 15, followed by guard Lisa Kowalewski with 13 and forward Tilly Payne with 12.

Politics takes toll on civility, unity

One outcome of this election season for me is that I’ve learned a lot about people in my community. As most everyone knows, I take a lot of pride in being a Missourian. I love being around folks who have grown up close to the soil. I’ve always felt I could find a way to get along with the kind of people who make a creed of common sense.

Somehow, something has sneaked into some people’s thinking that I can’t recognize. We are the kind of people who grew up going to Sunday school. Every year at every church, we did the Christmas pageants, where we dressed up like the wise men and Mary and Joseph and talked a lot about peace on Earth and good will toward men. We learned at home how to say “thank you” and “please” and, in kindergarten, how to play together in harmony. Since then, we’ve worked together, had meals together and shared the same goals for our community.

Two historic buildings up for renovation

More than $2 million will be spent to renovate two city buildings to make them compliant with fire and building codes.

The Columbia City Council unanimously approved a $2.3 million renovation plan on Monday for the Howard and Gentry buildings downtown. They also asked the architects to work on detailed specifications for the project.

A discount on a jolt for your vote

With 30 cents and an 18-year-old’s idealism, Timothy Kiefer turned Election Day into more than just his first opportunity to participate in democracy; he turned it into a test of his capitalist mettle.

Kiefer has worked for Lakota Coffee Co. for all of a month. He came up with a business idea early Tuesday morning that would result in skyrocketing sales and increased recognition for the coffee kiosk he runs at the Columbia Public Li-brary, which served as a polling place Tuesday.

Volunteers provide rides to the polls

Sitting behind the wheel of a large, empty bus with five vacant green seats, Daryll Watkins’ wide-eyed reflection shines through a rearview mirror with a small American flag appropriately hung next to it. For Watkins, the drive is work as usual. But today, his destination could help decide the course of a nation.

“I can go to these places and I show up with my mind and body, and I’m pretty good at it,” said Watkins, transportation coordinator for Services for Independent Living. “But I like going to places that my mind, body and heart is into.”

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