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Faces

Aaron Mantle is one of MU’s recognizable faces — students see him every day working in Brady Food Court.

Mantle said he enjoys his job because he likes talking to people and being able to help them.

Now You Know

What’s new: MU researchers are trying to find a way to break the protective coating of a bacterium resistant to antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common bacterium found in soil, water and even restaurant salad bars, doesn’t affect healthy humans, but it can be harmful to those with weakened immune systems. These include burn victims, people with cystic fibrosis and chemotherapy patients.

How it’s being done: Lesa Beamer, MU associate professor of biochemistry, studies the three-dimensional structures of enzymes that create the coating around bacteria and prevent antibiotics from getting in. Beamer determines which portions of the enzyme are important, how they are arranged and what function they serve. Peter Tipton, professor of biochemistry, studies how enzymes work.

How Do I?

Get tickets to events at the Hearnes Center or Paige Sports Arena?

The Paige Sports Arena, Hearnes Center and Hearnes Fieldhouse host a variety of events throughout the year, including MU and high school sporting events, concerts and special events. Tickets can be purchased the following ways:

Campus in brief

The Boone County chapter of the MU Alumni Association recognized Valerie Goodin with a Chapter Service Award. Goodin has served as staff liaison for eight years and worked intermittently with the chapter for several years before that.

Goodin, senior director of the Alumni Association, was given the award at the organization’s Blufftop Splendor event Oct. 28.

Five are appointed curator’s professors

Five MU faculty members were honored last week with the curator’s professorship award at the annual Faculty Recognition Banquet.

n Nelson Cowan was named curator’s professor of psychological sciences. Cowan is researching the ways to measure the capacity of working memory and how it changes with development of childhood.

Science association selects 5 MU fellows

The American Association for the Advancement of Science selected five MU professors, among 308 nationwide, as 2004 fellows for their efforts in advancing science and its applications, according to the MU News Bureau.

The professors chosen were chemistry professor Rainer Glaser and biological sciences professors Sandra Abell, Candace Galen, Emmanuel Liscum and John Charles Walker.

Group helps women adjust to American perspective

Lin Yi-jiun, a second-year MU doctoral student in counseling psychology, was unsatisfied after the first meeting of an international women’s support group she began leading on campus in September.

Why? Because there were too many Chinese speakers.

Extended season

As winter approaches, workers at MU’s Bradford Farm prepare for colder weather.

Preparation includes covering plants, which can allow them to live through several frosts, said MU research associate James Quinn.

Rams give Martz reason to smile

ST. LOUIS — Mike Martz’s week of anger was no empty display. He saw the season slipping away from the defending NFC West champions and thought taking potshots at his players might be his best shot at turning things around.

The St. Louis Rams responded to the tongue-lashings and physical practices by slapping around the Seattle Seahawks.

Student visa delays affect universities

Amid tighter scrutiny of foreign visitors since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, many U.S. universities are experiencing a sharp drop in the enrollment of international students.

It is an especially troublesome trend for science and engineering graduate schools, which get a large number of students from abroad.

Watkins takes step from Texas

Melvin Watkins, like most people, did not like taking a step back in his career. He did like the chance to be a part the Missouri basketball program, though.

“I’m excited to be here,” said Watkins, the Tigers’ new associate head coach. “Basketball here, I think, represents what college basketball should be about in terms of the exposure, in terms of the fan support. It’s unbelievable.”

Boys and Girls Town hopes to use Woodhaven site

When the Columbia branch of Boys and Girls Town of Missouri opened five years ago, it promised it would look for better facilities than its two houses and one administrative office scattered around the city.

The Columbia City Council will decide tonight whether the group can keep that promise.

Cougars off to best start in short history

The Columbia College women’s basketball team isn’t a typical repeat conference champion.

The Arena at Southwell Complex isn’t filled with banners profiling the team’s long, storied history because the team has been around for only three seasons. The Cougars, though, have won the American Midwest Conference the past two years.

This season, the Cougars, No. 13 in the NAIA, are off to their best start in the program’s history at 5-0. They have defeated opponents by an average of 15 points, but Davis and his team aren’t getting complacent.

Plan aims to reduce prisoner recidivism

When inmates are released from prison, they often face hurdles that prevent them from leading crime-free lives. Problems with substance abuse, mental health and job placement increase the likelihood that former inmates will return to prison.

A state initiative, called the Missouri Re-entry Process aims to decrease criminal recidivism by addressing such hurdles.

Going public

Laura Meyer is a Hickman High School senior and a National Merit Scholar semifinalist and is involved in the National Honor Society and other service-related activities.

Claire Schaeperkoetter is a West Junior High School freshman who plays basketball and soccer on Rock Bridge High School teams.

Schools aim to empower children vs. abuse

Deep, dark bruises are visible up and down the young boy’s arm. He flinches as the guidance counselor questions him.

“It’s against the law for adults to injure children,” the counselor says on the educational video.

Horning in

The Missouri volleyball team showed Sunday it doesn’t take a flawless performance to beat a top-10 team. A little resiliency, though, never hurts.

The Tigers easily won the first two games but lost the third and had to win a tight, back-and-forth fourth game to upset No. 9 Texas 30-23, 30-24, 22-30, 31-29 at Hearnes Center. It was MU’s fourth straight win and their 11th in the past 13 matches.

Keeping their Guardian up

The tournament to which Missouri and Creighton return has plenty of good memories for both teams, especially for former Tiger Travon Bryant.

The Tigers and the Bears will each make their second appearance in the Guardians Classic, a tournament both teams have won in the past three years.

Making the jump

It’s hard to imagine anyone calling Kalen Grimes, Missouri’s 6-foot-8 freshman center, a child. But Grimes’ mom, Glenda, doesn’t hesitate.

“I talk to my child several times a day, not that he always answers his cell phone,” Glenda Grimes said. “But seriously, we are very close.”

Search committee for dean chosen

MU interim Provost Lori Franz appointed a search committee Friday to find a replacement for the retiring dean of MU’s College of Education.

The dean, Richard Andrews, will retire in May. He has led the college since 1993.

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