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Speech focuses on role of science

About 50 people showed up at MU’s physics building Thursday to hear a spin on the Bush administration’s science and technology policy.

Mary Good, former undersecretary of technology administration during the Clinton administration, made the case that Americans need to take a good look at the role science plays in the nation — regardless of who wins the presidency Tuesday.

National soybean center opens at MU

U.S. Sen. Kit Bond greeted a crowd of scientists, professors and community members for the opening of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at MU on Thursday.

The center is on the second floor of the new Life Sciences Center. Speakers at the opening said they think research done at the center could lead to larger crop yields, new plant-based medicines and domestically manufactured energy sources.

Crime neutralized as campaign issue

Between the mid-1980s and early 1990s, according to the FBI, the number of violent crimes in the United States increased 34 percent. In response to public fears, Congress, in 1994, passed several major anti-crime bills that, among other things, put more police officers on the street and encouraged greater cooperation between law enforcement agencies and communities.

During the last decade, however, crime has steadily decreased, reaching a 30-year low in 2003. As a result, crime as a political issue has almost disappeared. The war in Iraq, the economy, jobs, health care and perhaps even stem cell research will have greater influence on the decisions of voters in Tuesday’s election than crime.

Faces: Geri Hudson

Places: Laws Observatory

On the fifth floor of the MU Physics Building, a narrow, curved staircase leads to a small room dominated by a large telescope pointed toward the dome ceiling.

This is Laws Observatory, open to the public from 8 to 10 p.m. every Wednesday. Stargazers can browse the exhibit room or look through one of three telescopes on the roof — at least for the near future.

Politics creep into the world of gaming

Somewhere in America, people with user names such as “little whip,” “Dr. Guy,” “Draginol” and “Darviathar” are making posts online. Their entry titles include “Why No Matter Who Wins, We’re Going to Be Alright” and “10,000 Lawyers Mass to Attack 2004 Election.”

These are the participants in online forums for “The Political Machine.”

Mo. lawyers ready for Election Day

KANSAS CITY — Squads of lawyers will be positioned at polling places across Missouri on Tuesday as part of a national effort to protect the integrity of the elections.

And no matter whose side they’re on, they’re ready to go to court if they have evidence that voters’ rights have been abridged.

Learning about WMD

As the spread of weapons of mass destruction is pushed to the forefront of American politics, MU students can take advantage of a new opportunity to become more informed on the subject.

Next semester, MU’s Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute will launch “Nuclear Engineering 4401: Nonproliferation Issues.” The course will be taught by nuclear engineering professors Mark Prelas and Tushar Ghosh. It will focus on the resources needed for the creation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. It will also look at the reasons these weapons are created and their dangers.

A boost for literacy

To improve their reading and writing, West Boulevard Elementary students are turning to some new arithmetic:

Literacy instruction times two equals language arts proficiency.

Hearnes gets into Halloween spirit

As the “Ghostbusters” theme song mingles with the laughter of an overstuffed pumpkin, a red, life-sized M&M rummages through her bag. Nearby, Spider-Man waits in line with his mother.

On Sunday night, the ninth annual Tiger Night of Fun at Hearnes Center Fieldhouse was under way. The Columbia Parks and Recreation Department sponsors the event each year.

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