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Blunt’s majority doesn’t guarantee easy ride

JEFFERSON CITY — For a freshman governor, Matt Blunt already has plenty of friends. With 120 fellow Republicans in the Legislature, Blunt theoretically could enact any proposal he likes, or stop anything he doesn’t. His own expectations are high.

Enough to win

The coach didn’t quite know what to say.

“Well, I think the most important thing coming out of this game is that fact that we won,” Missouri coach Cindy Stein finally said.

Bond back for Tigers

At halftime, LaToya Bond was upset in the locker room.

Against St. Louis on Sunday, Bond only had two points in the first half.

No kicking out Rams

ST. LOUIS — St. Louis Rams coach Mike Martz couldn’t care less that his team finished .500. Somehow, they are in the playoffs.

The Rams clinched a postseason berth when Jeff Wilkins kicked a 31-yard field goal in overtime to beat the New York Jets 32-29 on Sunday. They got a little help earlier in the day when Minnesota lost.

Chiefs’ winning streak fizzles

SAN DIEGO — Doug Flutie got to scramble around as he does so well and a nervous Philip Rivers threw his first NFL touchdown pass.

Now they get to give Drew Brees his job back.

Irresponsible parents hurt core of society

It happens at least once a month.

  I find myself feeling sad when I have to tell young parents that I can’t help them solve the problems they are having with their children. I have to tell them truthfully that I have no experience with children who have no respect for their parents. In the days of my childhood, the single, most powerfully motivating factor for doing good among my friends and me was the hope that our parents would be proud of our behavior.

Suspected meth lab discovered by deputies

A suspected methamphetamine lab was discovered at 12:53 p.m. Saturday at a residence at 10300 Route N in rural Boone County by deputies from the Boone County Sheriff’s Department.

The residents, Louis Henry, 34, and Octavia Price, 20, were arrested and charged with one count each of manufacturing a controlled substance.

Groovin’ on a Sunday afternoon

Although the second-floor balcony overlooking the entrance to the Columbia Public Library was quiet and nearly empty, Tom Verdot sat down, unpacked his instruments, closed his eyes and started fiddling anyway.

“If I didn’t enjoy it, I wouldn’t be doing it,” he said.

Army of support

On a hot summer afternoon in July, Samantha and Jacob Guilford watched an airplane touch down at Columbia Regional Airport then rushed to greet their father, Sgt. Stacy Guilford, with a “Welcome Home Daddy” banner and many long-awaited embraces.

It was a joyful reunion, but it didn’t last long. A 38-year-old Army reservist, Guilford was deployed to Iraq to fly Black Hawk helicopters. But two weeks after he came home in July, he had to say goodbye again to return to Iraq to finish his deployment.

Many resolve, again, to lose weight

A new year. A clean slate. Millions of resolutions.

Each New Year’s Eve, millions of people make promises to themselves that they’ll be better this year. They decide to quit smoking, lose weight or stop procrastinating. The tradition dates back 4,000 years to the early Babylonians who celebrated their New Year for 11 days at the beginning of spring. It was the time of rebirth, renewal and resolutions.

Baby makes a birthday gift

Jody Lewis received a special birthday gift early Saturday morning: the birth of her first child.

Devon Keith Lewis was born at 1:29 a.m. at Columbia Regional Hospital, making him Columbia’s first baby of 2005, a hospital spokeswoman said.

Establishing resolutions is the easy part

I have a 10-year journal that I use to record my daily thoughts. This is the beginning of the fourth year. After reviewing what I wrote on Jan. 1 of each and EVERY New Year’s Day, I decided to change my tune.

EVERY Jan. 1, I wrote that I would lose weight that year. Then, at the end of each first day’s missive, I wrote my current weight in teeny numbers.

A different attitude

Relaxed and upbeat, Missouri coach Quin Snyder took his place behind the podium for the post-game press conference Thursday.

As much as he wanted to celebrate with his team after a 63-61 win against No. 12 Gonzaga, Snyder willingly talked about the outcome with the press.

Next up: St. Louis

The Missouri women’s basketball team is looking to build a new winning streak.

The Tigers (5-5) will face Saint Louis University (1-11) today at 1:00 p.m. in Mizzou Arena.

Faith and Hoops

When Nancy Rutter Huerd started her basketball career at a lonely basketball hoop in the middle of a farming field in northeast Missouri, she knew hard work and faith in God would take her places. She just didn’t know where or how far.

It was the late 1960s, and there was no such thing as the WNBA or Title IX or even 5-on-5 women’s basketball. Girls played 6-on-6 in gym class, or maybe in junior high and high school if they were lucky. The closest thing to a professional women’s basketball league was the All American Redheads, who played from 1936-86. They dyed their hair red, wore full makeup on the court and traveled the country defeating men’s teams in the style of the Harlem Globetrotters.

Ringing in the new year

Unusually warm weather helped draw a record crowd to Columbia’s First Night celebration on New Year’s Eve.

Karen Ramey, First Night director, had predicted 8,000 people would attend, but on Friday night, she said, the crowd was even larger. Some venues were so full they had to turn people away.

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