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Articles

Trial begins for agent charged with killing parolee

Missouri fugitive apprehension agent Steven Julian will face a Callaway County jury on charges stemming from a February incident in Cape Girardeau.

Election polls expose some Americans' racism to the world

An Associated Press-Yahoo poll showed that many white Americans would not vote for a candidate because of the color of his skin. It's time for America to move on and get over themselves.

 

InBev shareholders approve Anheuser-Busch deal

Anheuser-Busch has not yet set a date for its shareholders to vote on the deal.

Lt. Gov. Kinder's employees awarded temporary pay raises

When some of Lt. Gov. Kinder's employees took temporary leave, the remaining employees took on the absent employees' pay in addition to their duties. Kinder maintains that these are salary increases, not bonuses, which would be illegal.

Seven Missouri congressional seats not expected to change

Incumbents holding seven of Missouri's nine U.S. House seats are likely to keep them after the November elections, although all face at least one challenger. 

Junior high marching bands play at Providence Bowl Parade

For the eighth graders in Columbia's junior high school bands, Friday's Providence Bowl Parade was their first public marching experience. The three junior high marching bands, alongside the high school bands, also played the national anthem at the rivalry game.

Overloaded Mo. public defenders will begin refusing clients

A recent policy approved by the Missouri Public Defender Commission will allow public defender offices that exceed maximum caseload capacity to reject new clients.

Investigation continues after police officer shoots man

A weekend incident in which a Cape Girardeau officer shot a man outside Copa Bar is still under investigation. The officer who fired the gun is on administrative leave. A police spokesman says there is no indication the officer did anything wrong. 

Fake police officer pleads guilty

Bill Jakob, 36, of Washington, Mo., pleaded guilty to charges that included 13 counts of impersonating federal law officers. He faces sentencing on Dec. 19. His attorney expects him to get about five years in prison.

Report: Political friction led to Graves' departure

Former U.S. Attorney Todd Graves of Missouri was likely forced out of his post in 2006 because of opposition from Missouri Sen. Kit Bond's office, according to a Justice Department investigation. Bond's legal counsel said Bond had no knowledge and was not involved in the multiple requests for Graves' removal.

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