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Articles

At the Missouri State Fair, roosters crow to be champion

Barnyard Stud, a rooster owned by Mitchell Cunningham, of Cairo, Mo., is the the winner of this year's Missouri State Fair Rooster Crowing Contest, which was held Monday.

Six finalists competed in the annual Rooster Crowing Contest. Mitchell Cunningham, 25, and his bird Barnyard Stud won the competition with 57 crows in a half-hour.

Missouri football newcomers coming along

Promising junior-college transfer Duron Singleton finally joined the team Monday after dealing with academic issues.

Students, faculty at Tolton Catholic agree bigger is better for the school's future

Fr. Tolton Regional Catholic High School begins its third year, with larger facilities, student body and its first senior class.

 

Winter landscape chosen as city's 2013 commemorative poster

A pastel drawing by artist Jerry Brown of a corn field during a Missouri winter was chosen for Columbia's commemorative poster.

UPDATE: Police seek suspect connected with burglary, assault cases

Samuel Nathaniel Allen is wanted in connection to an incident that happened at about 6:20 p.m. Sunday at 407 Audubon Drive.

Southeastern Conference announces new postseason bowl plans

The Southeastern Conference announced agreements with nine postseason bowl games and a new selection process for the bowl games on Monday.

Historic nomination for Harrisburg School clears state hurdle

The Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation unanimously approved the nomination of the Harrisburg School as a national historic site.

UPDATE: Missouri Fair clown draws criticism for Obama mask

Perry Beam, who was among the spectators, said "everybody screamed" and "just went wild" as the announcer talked about having the bull run down the clown with the Obama mask.

As maintenance backlog grows, Campus Facilities stretched thin

MU’s total repair backlog adds up to $552 million and grows by $22 million each year, said Gary Ward, MU’s associate vice chancellor for facilities.

Diocese identifies Columbia priest as helping at accident scene

The Diocese of Jefferson City official identified the Rev. Patrick Dowling as the clergyman who showed up at an accident scene but left before he was identified, thus ending a mystery that gripped many witnesses and first responders since the Aug. 4 incident.

Supporters learn how to keep Missouri Scout camp open

Members of the volunteer group met with Anne Soots, executive director of Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland, last week to discuss the future of the camp near Joplin, which has served Girl Scouts since 1946.

 

Manor Drive sidewalk project meeting to be held Tuesday to discuss changes

The changes to the project were the result of feedback gathered at the first interested parties meeting in April.

WHAT OTHERS SAY: Paying college players, changing education standards and

This is a roundup of recent editorials from newspapers across the U.S.

GUEST COMMENTARY: CATV needs community support

Today, CAT is constantly hard at work to lend a hand to the community. It has become an important player to the city’s greatest gems, whether it is True/False Film Festival, Citizen Jane Film Festival, Roots and Blues and BBQ Festival.

FROM READERS: Joe Dillard's retirement tree, 'a gift that keeps on giving'

When Joe Dillard retired from the Missouri Department of Conservation in 1998, he set up a scholarship and planted a retirement tree. He tells the story of both.

New state law paves way for physician assistants to practice more widely

A new law will lift strict supervision requirements over physician assistants. The law, which will go into effect Aug. 28, will make patient care more available and expand the job market in rural areas.

Early morning golf course pavilion fire causes significant damage

The Columbia Fire Department responded to the fire at about 3 a.m. and found the 30-by-30-foot bathroom pavilion burning.

New service brings retro video games to your door

The Peterson brothers say their plan is based on old-school economics. They rent the games out for $75 a month after purchasing the machines on the cheap and refurbishing them to their former glory.

 

World's first pop-art satellite headed to space

A satellite that will launch on Oct. 29 from Kazakhstan will have art etched onto its side. The satellite will be in orbit for 25 years.

In battle to protect power grid, trees often lose

Utility companies have been cutting trees down to reduce the number of blackouts. Not everyone is happy about that decision though as many homeowners want to protect their trees.

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