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Lifestyles

Functional and beautiful: Exhibit showcases common objects of the historic elite

COLUMBIA — In a small, beige-walled room at the Museum of Art and Archaeology, Kelly Archer had her first look at a trio of micromosaics, framed and under glass. The biggest one, no larger than a silver dollar, depicts the Coliseum of Rome in intricate detail. With the help of a magnifying glass, Archer got a better look at the hundreds of colored bits forming the rows of columns and arches.

The tiny representations of places abroad can be found in “The Fine Art of Living: Luxury Objects from the East and West,” currently at MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology. The exhibit features an array of useful and beautiful objects once owned by the noble elite from around the world.

Dean of MU School of Medicine is applicant for job in Arizona

William Crist, who is a candidate for a new position in the Health Affairs department at the University of Arizona, will visit the Tucson campus on Thursday to take part in a forum.

Mosquito season return; learn about them and how to prevent their bites

To mosquitoes, some of us are smorgasbords, and others are as tasty as cardboard. As the mosquito season begins in earnest — if it hasn’t already in your microclimate — those on the buffet line might dread its arrival more than the rest of us, but there’s no escaping.

Petting zoo brings exotic animals to fair

Offering an array of exotic animals for petting along with pony and camel rides, Hedrick’s Educational Petting Zoo opened at the Boone County Fair on Wednesday afternoon. It is the second time the zoo is participating in the fair.

Nixon unveils health care plan in Columbia

The attorney general promised if he's elected governor, he'll restore the Medicaid cuts signed into law by Gov. Matt Blunt.

CoxHealth to pay $60M to settle claims it paid doctors kickbacks

The payments to the government will also settle claims that the Springfield-based health care system billed Medicare for costs not allowed under federal laws. CoxHealth is not admitting any wrongdoing in the settlement.

Rabbi finds vegetarianism to be a religious ideal

Rabbi Yossi Feintuch says vegetarianism is a religious ideal. “When you read about the abuse of animals in our own industrial meat production, then you cannot say that God’s idea about compassion for animals is achieved,” he says. Feintuch blames the nature of modern-day factory farming. “When a shepherd slaughters his sheep, he has some personal sentiments for her, and he will do his best to make sure that she suffers the least, but that is not a value in the meat factory,” Feintuch says. “Judaism cannot be a part of that, as I see it.”

Poem by Pulitzer Prize winner donated to Southeast Missouri State University

The poem, “About a Little Girl,” was written by William Carlos Williams and will be kept in the rare book room of the university’s Kent Library. The family of the girl who the poem was written about donated the manuscript.

July testing at Lake of the Ozarks found low levels of E. coli

The Department of Natural Resources took 55 samples on July 7 from the Community Toll Bridge to mile marker 30. June tests found high levels of E. coli, mainly in high-traffic areas near Tan-Tar-A Resort.

Mo. woman says Wal-Mart, health officials discriminated against her monkey

Debby Rose of Springfield said in the lawsuit that the 10-year-old bonnet macaque helps curb a social anxiety disorder that can cause her to have panic attacks in public.

Animal-loving theater company puts on benefit for Columbia Second Chance

The Independent Actors Theatre will put on a cabaret-style performance which will include songs from classic musicals such as “Damn Yankees” as well as contemporary musicals such as “Wicked.”

Columbia Audubon Society's Cache Project helps protect mid-Missouri birds

Bird watching is more than just a leisure activity; it's also a means of keeping track of local birds and their special habitat needs.

Dhamma Day celebrates Buddhist teachers

Friday marks the day that Theravada Buddhists celebrate Dhamma Day, also known as Asalha Puja or Asanha Puja Day. The festival is celebrated on the full moon day of the eighth lunar month. Dhamma Day commemorates the first teaching of the Buddha.

Rock ’n’ roll cellist to perform at Missouri Theatre

Matt Haimovitz wants to let people know that classical music is still relevant by putting a modern twist on the genre of music that’s been around for hundreds of years.

Bristol-Myers Squibb to pay Mo. more than $11M to settle Medicaid fraud case

The payment is part of a national settlement in which the drug-maker has agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to 44 states and the federal government. Missouri’s portion of the settlement was announced Tuesday.

Torah thefts stump police, Jewish community

A Torah scroll valued at about $30,000 reported stolen from a St. Louis-area synagogue is one of a handful of Torah scrolls stolen in the past year in the United States. The motive may be a hate crime or the profit from selling sacred documents on the black market.

Archbishop Burke's farewell Mass set for Aug. 17

The leader of the Archdiocese of St. Louis was named last month as the first American to lead the Vatican supreme court.

Panelists debate: Jesus ... Who?

As part of its first Theology Weekend, Karis Community Church gave three panelists the chance to present and defend the Unitarian Universalist, Islamic and Christian viewpoints of who Jesus is.

Parents struggle with kids leaving for camp

For summer camp staff, dealing with "kid-sick" parents has become as common as tending to homesick kids. But experts say camp is good for both children and their parents.

MU medical students develop free clinic for the uninsured

The clinic will be staffed by student volunteers who will begin seeing 15 to 20 patients one day a week in fall 2008. The hours will expand as needed.

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