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Lifestyles

Bill encourages transparency in medical costs

The health plan put forward by Rep. Rob Schaaf would require doctors to inform patients of different prices.

BOONE LIFE: Satin & Chenille enchant through the power of love duets

The most elaborate item on the bandstand stage at CAT 3 television studios on the Stephens College campus was a simple black lectern — the kind one finds in high school music rooms and cheap hotel conference areas. Often overlooked, a lectern will typically lead an anonymous life lest it find itself bestowed with a national seal or a religious emblem.

Centennial: Health care

As we celebrate 100 years of the Missourian, we look back at 100 years of health care in our third issue of our Centennial special section.

Missouri Foundation for Health awards nearly $400,000 to six mid-Missouri organizations

Grant recipients plan to use the money to provide improved health care opportunities for area residents.

Huzzah! '50 foot robot' wins film competition

Film competition gives teams 48 hours to create films about local bands, network and learn.

BOONE LIFE: Guitar Hero Tournament rocks Columbia

Families lined up around the block for the second Guitar Hero Tournament on March 15 at the Blue Note.

Belief in brief: Passover

Psalms: Tools for prayer

Theologians say the answer to why psalms are so powerful lies in their variety, emotional honesty and occasional bluntness.

African art exhibit is ‘all about what you don’t see’

Ghanaian-born artist El Anatsui illustrates his provocative use of found-object art in his first U.S. solo show.

How to pick the perfect pillow

Pillow History

Pillows can be traced as far back as Mesopotamia (today’s Iraq) and ancient Egypt. Head rests were found in pharaohs’ tombs. Early versions were for the privileged and rich, according to “Really Useful: The Origins of Everyday Things” by Joel Levy, but they were hardly cushy. Most were solid wood, carved or curved slightly in the middle.

Strings, saxophones take top Plowman prizes

Jasper String Quartet of Rice University in Houston won the $5,000 grand prize in the third annual Plowman Chamber Music Competition. The third annual Plowman, which began Friday, attracted 26 ensembles representing 20 universities from across the country.

You know you're from Columbia if...

In Columbia, many people have been here for years, others for just a few months.

Some are just here to attend school, some chose this town to be their home.

But whether you’ve settled here for life or just for a couple of years, the question is this: How well do you know Columbia?

The Missourian asked at least 25 people what makes the city special and collected 15 ways to know you’re a die-hard Columbian.

Belief in brief: Orthodox Easter

Imam merges American roots and Islamic faith

Ronald Smith, the new imam at the Islamic Center of Central Missouri, talks about his role in the Muslim community, how he found faith and the influence his wife has had on his life.

Facts about Islam

Islam is one of the world’s fastest growing religions.

Bunraku - Telling stories through puppeteering

Members of the Bunraku Bay Puppet Troupe reveal their bruised and swollen hands after a demonstration of traditional Japanese puppetry. The strings and pulleys used to manipulate the puppets’ limbs cause visible wear and tear on their skin.

“They can be kind of hard to manipulate for 40 minutes on end when you’re just holding it up with one arm,” said troupe member and MU senior Brett Windhausen.

Doctors will receive guidelines regarding cancer costs

The American Society of Clinical Oncology is writing guidelines to help doctors become aware of the affordability of cancer treatment options.

Six New Life Community Church parishioners baptized on Easter Sunday

The Rev. Thomas Ragsdell baptized four children and two adults.

City to farm: The Dougherty family

On the phone, Debbie Dougherty reassures her father she will pick up the medicine for the animals on the way home.

Not the type of academic conversation one would expect for such a well-regarded MU professor of communications.

Debbie and her husband, Tom Clark, are academics, but they are also farmers. They live in Williamsburg, approximately 31 miles from farmhouse porch to her office door in Switzler Hall.

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