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Lifestyles

Two men preach from the ring

Two men wrestle with their faith in God to find meaning in life and share stories from unusual pulpits on how surrender brought them hope.

Columbia reports first drinking water violation in 3 decades

Columbia’s drinking water in 2007 exceeded government standards for a contaminant linked to a long-term cancer risk, the city reported Friday.

BOONE LIFE: Donning the dancing shoes

Chester and Marian Hilgedick navigate a two-step on the gym floor at the Ashland Senior Citizen Prom in perfect time with a grace acquired through 59 years as partners.

The story goes that Marian tagged along with a girlfriend who was going to a dance in Jefferson City. Chester spotted Marian in the room and quickly walked over and asked her to dance with him.

Special section: Who we are

Statistics reveal the way Columbians live, from favorite foods to voting habits.

Grace Bible Church to hold services in new building

The 400-plus member congregation of Grace Bible Church will soon move to its new location at 601 Blue Ridge Road.

Musical healing

Samuel Wong, president and founder of the Global Music Healing Institute, delivered the 2008 Carlos Perez-Mesa, MD, Lectureship in Medical Humanities about his research in music medicine on Thursday evening.

'Disposable' graduation gowns ending up in landfills

When Jeff Barnes listed his graduation cap and gown on eBay, he was thinking more about the environment than his wallet.

Barnes, who lives in a one-bedroom apartment, said he didn’t have the space or the sentimental inclination to keep the gown from his graduation at Macalester College, but didn’t want to throw it away either.

Belief in brief: The cross

It graces altars and automobiles, flags and flyers, steeples and stained glass. But the cross, now the most recognizable symbol of Christianity, wasn’t always a marker of faith.

Minister speaks about impact of politics, social concerns on her prayer life

For Kim Gage Ryan, a minister in Columbia, it's not just the political process and the campaigns that compel her to pray.

A soprano's song

While most MU students are occupied with the winding down of the spring semester, Emily Bennett, a senior vocal performing major, has been balancing her academic commitments with gaining national recognition as a soprano.

Columbia is taking steps to examine pharmaceuticals in drinking water

Testing on the city’s drinking water has been completed by the U.S. Geological Survey, and the city will launch a broad education campaign on May 1.

Mo. senators debate health coverage plan for uninsured

JEFFERSON CITY — After its flashy debut fizzled out, Gov. Matt Blunt's Insure Missouri proposal made a comeback of sorts today as senators debated legislation that eventually could subsidize health insurance for as many as 200,000 lower-income Missourians.

 

BOONE LIFE: Wii bowling tournament strikes against autism

On a drizzly Friday evening, 6-year-old Duke Newsted was all smiles as he learned how to bowl on a Wii at Jayden Roberts’ Wii Bowling Tournament at Friendship Place Youth Center in Centralia. Nicole Henry and Jordan Roberts, Jayden’s brother, helped teach Duke how to use his hand to control, swing and release the virtual bowling ball. After a few practice swings, Duke was giggling and clapping as he knocked over virtual pins.

The rising cost of food

Here’s a typical grocery list: ground beef, bread, eggs, grapes, cheese, milk and flour.

Today it would cost $18.28.

In February, it cost $17.57.

Last year, you would have spent $15.08.

It has become painfully obvious that grocery prices are on the rise.

Seminar aimed at helping churches quell congregational arguments

COLUMBIA — Wars between religions are not new, and most people are aware of fights within denominations. But congregational arguments are something different. Few people are aware of them or what they’re about.

Government group instructed to gather public input on how and when to vaccinate children

A government-appointed working group is charged with picking the most important safety questions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to research over the next five years. The group is to get public input in setting those priorities.

Third shot's the charm?

Most of the college students who got the mumps in a big outbreak in 2006 had received the recommended two vaccine shots, according to a study that raises questions about whether a new vaccine or another booster shot is needed.

Controversial Last Supper art removed from museum

Sexual painting of Christ’s final meal leads debate in heavily Catholic Austria

Belief in brief: Baha’i holiday Ridvan begins April 21

Ridvan is a 12-day celebration that is also known as “The Most Great Festival.”

'Objects of Affection' student art exhibit inspired by nostalgia

COLUMBIA– Jessica Forys created paintings and fabric sculptures, then she tore them apart and stuffed them with straw and sand. But it was all part of her plan.

“I take these remnants and make and destroy, make and destroy,” said Forys. “I love the constant flux.”

The fabric sculptures, or “unmades” as Forys calls them, were a part of “Objects of Affection,” her final exhibition as an MU graduate student. The installation was a mix of paintings, quilt-like hangings and fabric sculptures designed to provoke the viewer to “rekindle suppressed memories and feelings through the power

of objects,” according to the information about her show.

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