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Lifestyles

Farm to city: The Renwick family

The black sky met the 16 acres of land the Renwicks owned in Hillsboro, 45 miles south of St. Louis.

From her bathroom window, Annette Renwick could no longer see the two horses, five sheep and 11 chickens the family had acquired during the past 16 years.

The next day, the family was leaving for good. They were moving to Columbia.

The Renwick family sold their animals, left the in-ground swimming pool and the home they had built upon 16 acres of land to move from the farm to the city — a place where people live closer together, sit in traffic and wait in long lines at grocery stores at 6 p.m. on weeknights.

Farm to city; City to farm

Both traded what they knew for something new.

Belief in brief: The scenes of Purim

Purim is a Jewish holiday celebrating Esther’s deliverance of the Jewish people from Haman’s plot. The holiday is celebrated every year during the Jewish month of Adar II.

Husband and wife to share sermon Sunday

The Easter Resurrection is more than a story for these two pastors: It is a hope for new life in the Rev. Bonnie Cassida's husband's body.

Columbia pastors make sermon preparations for Easter crowds

Easter sermons are like the Super Bowl of Sundays for clergy. It’s one Sunday that generally draws record attendance, and pastors like to deliver their best sermon of the year.

Retired architect is painter at heart

A blank sheet of paper waits for Jerry Thompson’s wet paintbrush in a neatly organized studio built above his garage. In two hours, the white paper transforms into a watercolor painting of a foggy pasture scene infused with light and and color.

Gardeners use the Internet to create a virtual community

A year ago, Elizabeth Licata became the fourth member of a group of garden bloggers with an attitude. Garden Rant (gardenrant.com) started in mid-2006: A blend of gossip, news, crusade and, yes, raw rant, it blows the cobwebs out of gardening’s mustier corners.

Experts explore causes and effects of tooth grinding

Teeth are made for collisions. They mash hamburgers and break hard candy into tiny pieces. But when they grind together, they can wear down and lead to other health problems.

Tooth grinding is a condition that affects many people, but exactly how many is not clear.

Museum of Art and Archeology offers vintage films in conjunction with current exhibits

Every third Thursday of the month, MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology will screen a vintage film mostly from the 1940s or early 1950s that has a connection to one of the museum’s exhibits.

Survey: College students stressed, but majority are hopeful

WASHINGTON — College kids are so frazzled they can’t sleep or eat. Or study. Good grief, they’re even anxious about spring break.

Internet transforms gardening

The invention and universal acceptance of the Internet has transformed gardening, and for the better.

Guitar Hero allows youths to shred like rock stars

The widely popular video game Guitar Hero has spurred tournaments, been featured on TV and given many the chance to feel what it’s like to be a rock star. But for guitar players, the game has a slightly different draw.

BOONE LIFE: Small dog, big wins at Columbia Kennel Club dog show

Carly won Best in Show at the Boone County dog show on March 9. Carly travels with her owner and handler to more than a hundred dog shows a year.

Hindu Temple celebrates its anniversary

Shanthi Mandir, the Hindu Temple and Community Center of Mid-Missouri, commemorated its second year of existence in Columbia on Friday night.

Boone Hospital Center staying on top with new Spine Center

The wood floors, hair salon and 20 private rooms on the redesigned fifth floor of Boone Hospital Center create an atmosphere more like a hotel than a place where patients come for orthopedic care. A plastic model of a spine near the nurses’ station gives away the location: the hospital’s new Spine Center.

St. Patrick’s Day self-defense

Use these strategies to protect yourself from people who pinch you for not wearing green.

Evangelicals in the city

You may wonder who moves to Manhattan as an undergraduate and spends Saturday night parsing the words of a theologian. Here’s a guess: no one except the students of the King’s College, an evangelical college located in the Empire State Building.

A new style of evangelical

NEW YORK — King’s College’s style of “new Christian urbanism,” as its provost calls it, frowns on hard-sell proselytizing. But students at the King’s have been known to strike up conversations in the city with strangers, hoping, at minimum, to change their mind about evangelicals.

Historic home in downtown Columbia provides community for artists

Singer-songwriter Samuel Combs was traveling throughout New Zealand and working at various organic farms in September when he realized he wanted to devote more time to growing as an artist. Earlier in the year he had met Lizzie West, co-founder of Holy Road Tours Union, and learned about the Holy Road House in Columbia, that serves as a boarding house for developing artists who need space to further explore their craft. Wanting ample time to perfect his music, Combs moved to Columbia in January and later became the Holy Road Tours Union tour director.

It’s almost show time for the Missouri Theatre

The old Missouri Theatre stirs as restorations and renovations progress.

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