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Lifestyles

Forging a better path

Youth Empowerment Zone gives teens a chance to start a new chapter in their lives.

Jehovah's Witnesses convene in Columbia for district convention

The three-day program will welcome 51 congregations from mid-Missouri.

The Eastern Orthodox Christian Tradition of Fasting

Eastern Orthodox Christians began a 15-day fast Aug. 1. Fasting is a tradition that varies among religions.

Columbia artist creates outsider art

 Teriko, who goes by only a first name, considers art to be a question of semantics.

'The King and I' performances set to begin at Missouri Theatre

After 140 hours of rehearsal with 41 kids and 29 orchestra members, performances of “The King and I” will begin Thursday.

For His Glory Dance ministry uses Christian principles to guide relationships

Six-year-old Rickeah “Kiki” Henderson slowly edges her way into the brightly lit “Blind” Boone Center auditorium on a Wednesday night, right on time for dance practice. She is bashful, and her father has to coax her into the room. Already inside and waiting for practice to officially begin, the other members of For His Glory Dance Ministry are dancing and giggling.

Columbia resident Charles Shipman receives Master Pilot award

Shipman has compiled more than 4,000 hours piloting helicopters and 4,700 hours piloting airplanes over 50 years.

Functional and beautiful: Exhibit showcases common objects of the historic elite

COLUMBIA — In a small, beige-walled room at the Museum of Art and Archaeology, Kelly Archer had her first look at a trio of micromosaics, framed and under glass. The biggest one, no larger than a silver dollar, depicts the Coliseum of Rome in intricate detail. With the help of a magnifying glass, Archer got a better look at the hundreds of colored bits forming the rows of columns and arches.

The tiny representations of places abroad can be found in “The Fine Art of Living: Luxury Objects from the East and West,” currently at MU’s Museum of Art and Archaeology. The exhibit features an array of useful and beautiful objects once owned by the noble elite from around the world.

Dean of MU School of Medicine is applicant for job in Arizona

William Crist, who is a candidate for a new position in the Health Affairs department at the University of Arizona, will visit the Tucson campus on Thursday to take part in a forum.

Mosquito season return; learn about them and how to prevent their bites

To mosquitoes, some of us are smorgasbords, and others are as tasty as cardboard. As the mosquito season begins in earnest — if it hasn’t already in your microclimate — those on the buffet line might dread its arrival more than the rest of us, but there’s no escaping.

Petting zoo brings exotic animals to fair

Offering an array of exotic animals for petting along with pony and camel rides, Hedrick’s Educational Petting Zoo opened at the Boone County Fair on Wednesday afternoon. It is the second time the zoo is participating in the fair.

Nixon unveils health care plan in Columbia

The attorney general promised if he's elected governor, he'll restore the Medicaid cuts signed into law by Gov. Matt Blunt.

CoxHealth to pay $60M to settle claims it paid doctors kickbacks

The payments to the government will also settle claims that the Springfield-based health care system billed Medicare for costs not allowed under federal laws. CoxHealth is not admitting any wrongdoing in the settlement.

Rabbi finds vegetarianism to be a religious ideal

Rabbi Yossi Feintuch says vegetarianism is a religious ideal. “When you read about the abuse of animals in our own industrial meat production, then you cannot say that God’s idea about compassion for animals is achieved,” he says. Feintuch blames the nature of modern-day factory farming. “When a shepherd slaughters his sheep, he has some personal sentiments for her, and he will do his best to make sure that she suffers the least, but that is not a value in the meat factory,” Feintuch says. “Judaism cannot be a part of that, as I see it.”

Poem by Pulitzer Prize winner donated to Southeast Missouri State University

The poem, “About a Little Girl,” was written by William Carlos Williams and will be kept in the rare book room of the university’s Kent Library. The family of the girl who the poem was written about donated the manuscript.

July testing at Lake of the Ozarks found low levels of E. coli

The Department of Natural Resources took 55 samples on July 7 from the Community Toll Bridge to mile marker 30. June tests found high levels of E. coli, mainly in high-traffic areas near Tan-Tar-A Resort.

Mo. woman says Wal-Mart, health officials discriminated against her monkey

Debby Rose of Springfield said in the lawsuit that the 10-year-old bonnet macaque helps curb a social anxiety disorder that can cause her to have panic attacks in public.

Animal-loving theater company puts on benefit for Columbia Second Chance

The Independent Actors Theatre will put on a cabaret-style performance which will include songs from classic musicals such as “Damn Yankees” as well as contemporary musicals such as “Wicked.”

Columbia Audubon Society's Cache Project helps protect mid-Missouri birds

Bird watching is more than just a leisure activity; it's also a means of keeping track of local birds and their special habitat needs.

Dhamma Day celebrates Buddhist teachers

Friday marks the day that Theravada Buddhists celebrate Dhamma Day, also known as Asalha Puja or Asanha Puja Day. The festival is celebrated on the full moon day of the eighth lunar month. Dhamma Day commemorates the first teaching of the Buddha.

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