advertisement

Lifestyles

FROM READERS: Columbia preacher goes out of his comfort zone with a new congregation

Carl Kenney had to take a new approach to sermons at Bethel Church.

Police Department to get drug incinerator from health department

A drug incinerator was purchased by the Public Health and Human Services for the Columbia Police Department to to dispose of illicit drugs.

Health department to offer free vaccines Tuesday evening

The Columbia/Boone County Department of Public Health and Human Services will offer free vaccines to students from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday evening at its clinic, at 1005 W. Worley St.

How does Ebola virus spread, and can it be stopped?

Typically, outbreaks of the disease have been in other parts of the continent, not in West Africa.

'Gluten-free labeling standards kick in

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don't absorb nutrients well.

Food allergies challenge children, parents in unexpected ways

Food allergies are on the rise, and experts are not sure why. But Columbia families like the McFetterses and the Popes are well aware of their impact on daily life.

ENGAGEMENT: Elizabeth Hobbs, John Clay plan 2015 wedding

The couple are planning a May 24, 2015, wedding at Peace Lutheran Church in Washington, Missouri.

FROM READERS: Hometown Homecare to offer free open house, cancer screenings

The organization has been providing non-profit care for 46 years. Ellis Fischel Cancer Center will be at Hometown Homecare, in Fayette,on September 2 from 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. to perform mammograms on site

Health department provides free vaccinations

Free vaccines will be administered on Saturday morning at the health department clinic at 1005 W. Worley St.

Virus drugmaker fights pediatricians' new advice

It's the second time in two years that the influential group has recommended narrowing use of the drug, sold by MedImmune under the brand name Synagis. MedImmune is fighting back with full-page newspaper ads that say the updated policy threatens "our most vulnerable babies."

Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report. That's better than a high-five, which still passes along less than half the amount as a handshake.

FROM READERS: MU medical student counts down to Ramadan

Nebihah Maqbool, a medical student at MU, wrote this post in anticipation of Ramadan for Columbia Faith & Values. Muslims will celebrate the end of the fast Monday.

FROM READERS: The House of Treasures becomes the house of God

Missourian reader Norma Schmitz shares her experience at a new house of worship in town.

Construction begins on new Boone Hospital Center campus

The $20 million, 125,000 square foot medical plaza will be completed in 2015 at the intersection of Nifong and Forum boulevards. A memorial to Columbia Police Officer Molly Bowden, formerly located at the intersection, will be moved and expanded because of the construction.

Genetic mapping triggers new hope on schizophrenia

More than 100 researchers from around the world collaborated in the biggest-ever genomic mapping of schizophrenia, for which scientists had previously uncovered only about a couple of dozen risk-related genes.

HIV diagnosis rate fell by third in U.S. over decade

The reasons for the drop aren't clear. It might mean fewer new infections are occurring. Or that most infected people already have been diagnosed so more testing won't necessarily find many more cases.

Democrats seek gains with women in birth control loss

Republicans blocked a bill that was designed to override a Supreme Court ruling and ensure access to contraception for women who get their health insurance from companies with religious objections. The vote was 56-43 to move ahead on the legislation four short of the 60 necessary to proceed.

UPDATE: Studies see new risks for cholesterol drug niacin

New details from two studies reveal more side effects from niacin, a drug that many Americans take for cholesterol problems and general heart health. Some doctors say the drug now seems too risky for routine use.

Federal agency toughens protections for pregnant workers

The government has updated 30-year-old guidelines, citing "the persistence of overt pregnancy discrimination, as well as the emergence of more subtle discriminatory practices."

Columbia woman to compete in Miss Africa USA

Patricia Simbu Mabengo, who is originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, hopes the pageant will help her raise awareness about rape as a weapon of war and to empower survivors in her homeland.

advertisements