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Lifestyles

New FDA rules could affect menus at restaurants, other stores

Calorie counts could soon accompany items on restaurant menus, but grocery stores, convenience stores, movie theaters, planes and trains may be exempt.

Measles off to a fast start as cases trend up

Authorities say 129 cases in 13 states were reported by mid-April, the bulk of them in California and New York City. Most were triggered by travelers who caught the virus abroad and spread it in the United States among unvaccinated people.

FDA OKs first-ever DNA alternative to Pap smear

Federal health regulators have cleared a genetic test from Roche as a first-choice screening option for cervical cancer. It was a role previously reserved for the Pap smear, the decades-old mainstay of women's health.

FDA eases into regulating e-cigarettes

Most everyone agrees a ban on selling them to kids would be a step forward. But health and public policy experts can't say for certain whether the electronic devices are a good thing or a bad thing overall.

ArtTalk: Folk singer/guitarist David Dearnley makes up for lost time

David Dearnley performs predominately solo, singer/songwriter original, acoustic music.

Bill Busch's passion for scuba diving started early, never waned

Bill Busch has been a scuba diving instructor for 50 years. Teaching scuba diving has given him the opportunity to build strong relationships with his students, who often return to help with his class, even after they have become certified.

Columbia pastor balances two Sturgeon churches with declining memberships

Sturgeon was home to seven small churches two decades ago. Now, there are only three, and two of those have seen declining attendance among younger people.

Study: Diabetic heart attack and stroke rates falling

The study also showed declines in diabetes-related kidney failure and amputations.

House OKs notification for ending fluoridation

The legislation would require notification at least 90 days before a vote to permanently cease fluoridation.

Study finds signs of brain changes in recreational marijuana users

A study to be published Wednesday suggests that marijuana use might result in anatomical changes to users' brains.

Battle Club at Tiger Academy of Gymnastics offers fitness alternative

Craig Butler's brainchild helps keep children active with innovative games and a competitive atmosphere.

ArtTalk: Local artist produces textured paintings, most recently of animal eyes

Scott Kronk works largely with thickened acrylic-based media and pallete knives.

St. Louis-area hospital to offer midwife option

Mercy officials said it will give women the option of a birth without medical intervention that's overseen by a midwife, but with medical personnel nearby in case of complications.

Gallery showcases immigrant photography at Columbia library

"The Missouri Immigrant Experience: Faces and Places" photo exhibit will be on display at the Columbia Public Library from April 5 to 25.

Schools increasingly check students for obesity

Some school district do what is known as surveillance, in which students are measured to identify how many are at risk for weight-related health problems but they remain anonymous. Other districts do screenings to track the weight of individual students and notify parents whose children are classified at an unhealthy weight.

Study: Married folks have fewer heart problems

A New York University study found that married couples were at a lower risk than single and divorced people for cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and obesity and were less likely to smoke.

U.S. autism estimate grows to 1 in 68 children

The latest calculation means autism is more than twice as common as officials said it was just seven years go.

Study: Sober smartphone app 'makes a big difference' in alcoholics' recovery

A panic button can be programmed to notify peers who are nearest the patient when the button is pushed. It also offers links to relaxation techniques to calm the patient while he or she waits for help.

Salmon-Sharp vows planned

Ryan Salmon and Warren Sharp plan May 31, 2014, wedding in Springfield.

 

Report: Labor in tub OK but water birth benefits unproven

Sitting in a tub of warm water can relieve pain during the early stages of labor, but actually giving birth under water has no proven benefit and may be risky, say recommendations for the nation's obstetricians.

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