advertisement

Lifestyles

Gallery showcases immigrant photography at Columbia library

"The Missouri Immigrant Experience: Faces and Places" photo exhibit will be on display at the Columbia Public Library from April 5 to 25.

Schools increasingly check students for obesity

Some school district do what is known as surveillance, in which students are measured to identify how many are at risk for weight-related health problems but they remain anonymous. Other districts do screenings to track the weight of individual students and notify parents whose children are classified at an unhealthy weight.

Study: Married folks have fewer heart problems

A New York University study found that married couples were at a lower risk than single and divorced people for cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and obesity and were less likely to smoke.

U.S. autism estimate grows to 1 in 68 children

The latest calculation means autism is more than twice as common as officials said it was just seven years go.

Study: Sober smartphone app 'makes a big difference' in alcoholics' recovery

A panic button can be programmed to notify peers who are nearest the patient when the button is pushed. It also offers links to relaxation techniques to calm the patient while he or she waits for help.

Salmon-Sharp vows planned

Ryan Salmon and Warren Sharp plan May 31, 2014, wedding in Springfield.

 

Report: Labor in tub OK but water birth benefits unproven

Sitting in a tub of warm water can relieve pain during the early stages of labor, but actually giving birth under water has no proven benefit and may be risky, say recommendations for the nation's obstetricians.

More U.S. adults eligible for statins under new guidelines

Almost half of Americans ages 40 to 75 and nearly all men over 60 qualify to consider cholesterol-lowering statin drugs under new heart disease prevention guidelines, an analysis concludes.

Study to test 'chocolate' pills for heart health

The idea of the study is to see whether there are health benefits from chocolate's ingredients minus the sugar and fat, said JoAnn Manson, preventive medicine chief at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Author Phyllis Tickle lectures on social change, how the church needs to adapt

The information age embodies a cultural shift to which contemporary Christians must react, said Phyllis Tickle, author and lecturer on Christianity. What will result could be a transformation as game-changing as that of the Protestant Reformation.

ArtTalk: Watercolor artist inspired by Ozarks, nature

Shannah Arner describes what inspires her to create watercolor art.

Local churches begin Lent with Ash Wednesday services

Wednesday marks the centuries-old tradition of Ash Wednesday, a holiday observed by Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran and other churches. Ash Wednesday is named for the use of burned palm leaves saved from Palm Sunday the previous year.

Richard Stickann to discuss new novel at Columbia bookstore

Richard Stickann will be reading from his novel, "Hobbledehoy Boy," which explores the themes of adolescent awkwardness, Wednesday at the Yellow Dog Bookshop.

Ceramic artist's teacup display finds a home in city hall

For ceramic artist Norleen Nosri, being selected to create artwork for the Percent For Art Program meant creating a sense of togetherness for Columbia. Norsi's teacup display of the cups and containers now sit in a glass case on the fourth floor of Columbia’s city hall.

Snack, soda makers play controversial role in education of dietitians

Snack and soda makers that often are blamed for contributing to national obesity rates also provide educational courses for dietitians. The practice has raised ethical concerns from some who say it gives the food industry too much influence over dietitians.

True/False Film Fest 2014: Fact, fiction and everything in between

True/False Film Fest's founders, David Wilson and Paul Sturtz, explore the middle ground between nonfiction and fiction storytelling in this year's festival.

Karis Church to open downtown art gallery, lecture space

When DreamCatcher moved out and downtown studio space opened up, Karis church turned to volunteers and fundraising to open an art gallery.

Report indicates changing obesity rates among kids

The changing health-related landscape might have contributed to the drop in preschool obesity, such as the decline in consumption of sugary drinks and programs that give access to fresh and affordable produce.

MU Health Care to open three clinics in Columbia Hy-Vee stores

Hy-Vee walk-in clinics will be open seven days a week and treat members of the community for common illnesses and minor injuries.

Blunt pushes congressional award for Monuments Men

Sen. Blunt spoke at the State Historical Society about his proposed bill to award the Congressional Gold Medal to members of the Monuments Men.

advertisements