advertisement

Features

Christmas tree farm grows traditions

Breathe in the fresh pine air, grab a saw and take a tour of the Log Providence Pines Christmas tree farm. Dean Fitzgerald and his wife, Diane, serve up hot cider and family traditions along with acres of trees. For some people, it wouldn't be Christmas without a fresh-cut tree.

The struggling circus

On Circus Day, time stood still. Banks and schoolhouses shut their doors, and unpaved Main streets were clogged with folks from down the block and across the county.

Children stood alongside businessmen as everyone strained to hear the air calliope, also known as a steam organ, and squinted to see the first cart of the horse-drawn spectacle: the circus parade.

As cart after cart passed through the throngs, people who might never have ventured more than a few miles from where they were born stared tigers, monkeys and elephants straight in the eyes.

"Back then, it was an annual event," said circus clown Joey Kelly of St. Louis. "You saved up for it. When circuses came to town, a lot of businesses shut down, so you could make a day of it."

Janet Davis, associate professor of American studies at the University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Circus Age," said the circus was the biggest thing going at the turn of the century.

Businessman owns five companies at age 23

At his core is an entrepreneurial drive, something fostered in the Columbia native at an early age by family, lemonade and some magic.

Florist shares details of life in flower business

Have the familial hordes picked over your table, here's what to do with the leftovers

When you cook for the masses on Turkey Day, you're bound to have so remnants left on the table after it's all over. Here are some quick recipes to help keep the fridge free of clutter.

Stuck in the airport? Learn the alphabet

Enriching lives

Bouncing on her mother's knee, Sophia Rounds sat in a green onesie, a snail prominently displayed on the front, and pulled her mother's brown hair. Throughout their appointment, the 5-month-old blonde kept tugging her mom's hair, prompting Jill Rounds to look down and ease her baby's grip every couple of minutes as she answered a series of questions about herself and Sophia.

'Jeopardy' contestant has the answers

Chris Mazurek and his wife used his winnings from the game show to help them buy a new house.

The Blind Boys of Alabama make a joyful noise

The Blind Boys of Alabama have been making gospel music since 1939. Throughout its career, the group has known tragedy and success.

Bacchanalia confined: Plastic fencing promises better crop for grape growers

While late spring freezes zapped much of Missouri’s wine grapes, the ongoing drought drove thirsty critters to finish off much of what remained. Some local growers are putting up fences to keep the grazing deer at bay.

Ideological scales: A look at Columbia's political landscape

At the intersection of Providence and Broadway, Claire Garden holds a sign above her head that says: “This Time Don’t Buy the Lies.” It’s less than 50 degrees outside, and the wind is chilling. But she and a dozen other Columbia residents are out soliciting honks for peace.

Columbia’s Dirty Jobs: The poop scooper

Starting today, the Missourian presents a snapshot of the lives of people who do the jobs most of us would rather not. Taking a cue from the Discovery Channel show “Dirty Jobs,” this five-day series highlights women and men in mid-Missouri who don’t mind getting their hands dirty to earn a few greenbacks.

Storytellers tell how they spin tales

Local storytellers have been working together for years to hone their craft. One group focuses on ghost stories, and Halloween is their season to shine.

Women in journalism

Now and Then: Examining women in journalism

The National Women and Media Collection at MU is turning 20. Female journalists examine where they have been and where they are now.

In their own words: The many faces Mohamed Gumati

Twenty-seven years ago, Mohamed Gumati came from Libya to finish his degree. He stayed, and he thrived.

Replanting Afghanistan

This fall, Capt. Doug Dunlap of the Guard will lead a team of four or five guardsmen to Afghanistan to lay the groundwork for a pilot project designed to effect a sea change in the agriculture industry.

Yoga: Where old meets new

Acrobatic sport parkour makes its way to mid-Missouri

Parkour combines the agility of gymnastics with outdoor settings to create a sport that encourages those who practice it to be efficient and quick. A short film clip from a group of friends who practice parkour in Columbia will be shown at the next True/False Film Festival.

Boone Junction tours showcase history

Boone Junction is a historical village that showcases the history of Boone County. The Historical Society is adding buildings to the village.

advertisements